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Gardens are lovely places for your dog to play and relax in. Having said that, it’s also the perfect place to wreak havoc too, like digging up your strawberry plants!

Some gardens can also be dangerous to dogs because of the plants that are growing, due to harmful chemicals or sharp edges.

There are plenty things you can do to make sure your dog can have a safe sanctuary in your backyard. Here’s a few to get you started.

Make the garden exciting

Make different routes around and through your garden so your pup can have an adventure. If you have the space, create some digging spots too to give your dog a bit of stimulation. The more textures you offer your pup, the more fun it will be because it’s giving them all sorts of different experiences into one.

Dogs wee on lawns

A dogs wee can turn your beautiful green grass into horrible patches of yellow. Try and train your dog not to pee on the lawn, but if there’s nowhere else for them to go in the garden, hose the area down straight after. If that option still doesn’t work for you, think about investing in some pet zen garden grass. This is soft and fluffy just like real grass, but it’s synthetic instead, meaning your dog can pee, and nothing will get ruined. And when they do their business, just clean it up with a doggy bag like you usually would.

Plant robust plants

Playful pups can damage your delicate flowers, so if you don’t want this to happen, either create a fence around them or just take them out and replace them with something a lot more robust, than won’t die if it gets knocked around a little. Lavender is a great option and leaves your garden smelling divine.

Keep dogs away from slugs and snails

Be very wary when it’s damp outside, that your dog doesn’t come into contact with any slugs or snails. If your pup ingests these, they may get lungworm which isn’t pleasant. Symptoms include lethargy, difficulty in breathing, and coughing. If you notice any of these, take them to the vets.

Avoid toxic plants

There are many plants out there that are extremely harmful to your furry friends. Buttercups, daffodils, foxglove, oaks, tomatoes, and yew are just a few examples of what to avoid.

If you notice a change in your dog and think they may have eaten something they shouldn’t have, take them straight to the vets just to be on the safe side.

Secure your compost bin

If you have a compost bin in your garden, your dog may be very interested in it, especially if it contains scraps of old food giving off all sorts of different odours. These may be harmful to your pup though, so make sure they can’t break into it.

Keep your shed secure

If you have a shed in your garden, make sure it’s locked up and your dog has no way of getting in. You don’t want them having access to any sharp tools, electrical equipment, or harmful chemicals.

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