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Epilepsy in dogs can be traumatic for both dog and owner. While it’s uncertain why this condition occurs, it’s thought to be a genetic trait. An epileptic pooch will be a happy, bubbly pup the majority of the time. But, when seizures strike, the may take you both by surprise. The extreme physical exertion on your dog’s body can be tough for them. Not to mention that seeing your beloved pet have a seizure can be traumatic.

The good news is, an epileptic dog can live a long and healthy life. This may be an extra worry which you didn’t bank on when you brought your pup home. But, there’s no reason you can’t get a decent handle on this long-term condition. To help you get off on the right footing, we’re going to look at how you can ensure your dog suffers as little as possible.

Manage Medication

Though no tablets can cure the condition as such, they at least offer a chance to control it. The most common drugs prescribed are phenobarbital and potassium bromide. Both attempt to prevent seizures. The chances are, your dog will need to take one of these throughout their life. So, you need to learn how to manage their medication.

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Getting dogs to take tablets is never an easy task. That doesn’t change when their medication is long-term. To make matters worse, phenobarbital causes weight gain, which worsens if given with food. So, try your hardest to get your dog to take their pills as they are. There are many methods to try, including massaging their throat or putting the pill far back If all else fails, you could turn to something like these pill treats for dogs. Though your dog will still be eating, this is better than crushing their medication into a whole meal.

 

Know The Warning Signs

 

Even when they’re on medication, your dog may have seizures. As an epileptic dog owner, it’s your responsibility to recognize the signs so that you can protect your pooch. Over time, you’ll come to know your dog’s distinct warning signs, but for the most part, pre-seizure dogs enter what’s called an ‘aura.’. During this time, they may become distressed, dazed, or have an accident. As soon as you spot these signs, make sure to keep a close eye out.

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Secure Your Dog During Seizures

When people have seizures, we clear the way and make sure they don’t hurt themselves. Your dog is no different. Acting the right way during their seizure is sure to lessen their distress. Though your first instinct may be to call them out of it, it’s important to let a seizure run its course. All you need to do is place down some towels to protect your pup, and also soak any accidents they have. Give them time, and they’ll come round when they’re ready.

When leaving the dog home alone, remove their collar, and cover anything hard so that you know they’ll be okay if a seizure strikes.

 

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