Whether you’re moving to another state, a different country or just down the block, moving with your dog can be stressful. Packing all your belongings, making sure everything is stacked away safely and crossing off your checklist can be nerve-racking enough. When you add in a dog that won’t sit still, crates and playpens in the combination, things can get even more draining. To come to your help, we’ve hand-picked 10 tips for the big day. Read on to find out how to soothe a stressed dog, how to plan ahead and what you should prepare for your destination.

 

1. Your Dog’s Toys Should Be Packed Last

You don’t want to stress out your dog days or weeks in advance. If they have a favorite room in your house, you should pack it last. This way, the dog will still be in a familiar surrounding while the rest of house is being wrapped up and packed in cardboard boxes. When you do have to pack your dog’s toys, make sure to leave a couple of his favorite out. Your pet might be traveling with you or in a crate but either way, they will benefit from the comfort a familiar toy brings.

Image Source

 

2. Take Your Dog Out for Moving Day

When moving day rolls around, it might be a good idea to take your dog for a long walk or even take it to a friend’s place (if they are familiar and comfortable with that person). On moving day, your house will probably be filled with people coming and going, furniture being moved around with loud noises. If possible, take your dog out or take them to a vet’s boarding. This will protect them from the stressful noise and unfamiliar faces in their environment.

 

3. Consider Using Professional Services for Relocation

Moving day is not only stressful for your dog, it’s bound to take its toll on you as well. From dealing with suitcases, documents, and specific crate sizes, figuring everything out can be time consuming and energy depleting. If you want the moving process to go as smooth as possible for both you and your dog, trust a professional pet relocation company with helping you out and relieving the load. They are fully equipped to handle all types of relocations, dogs of different sizes and breeds, all needed documentation and mandatory vaccines.

 

4. Grab a Baggage Cart in the Airport

You might not need a baggage cart for your suitcases on wheels, but transporting your dog in a crate can go much smoother if you use a cart. Regardless of your dog’s size, it can be cumbersome to wheel your luggage, hold on to your passport and also carry your dog. The cart comes in handy and gives your pet a smoother ride.

 

5. Introduce Your Dog to the Crate Weeks in Advance

If you’re using your own car to relocate, you still need a crate for your dog. And if you are flying to your new home, you definitely need to transport your pet in a crate that follows the airline’s guidelines. Since your dog will be spending hours in his crate, it’s always good to introduce him to it in advance. This way, he will be familiar with the new space and even warm up to it. You can crate train your dog either by leaving the crate out and waiting for him to step inside it on his own or by placing a familiar toy or blanket inside. This will encourage your pet to go inside and explore, without feeling like they are being forced into unknown areas.

 

6. Take the Dog for Car Rides in His Crate

Dogs thrive on routine so the big moving day is bound to disrupt their lives and bring about a lot of stress and anxiety. You can help reduce your dog’s anxiety levels by getting him acquainted with car rides. Increase the length of the rides gradually so that your dog can adjust to the new settings and sensations. This can be beneficial even if your dog will embark on a plane journey since he gets the chance to feel comfortable in a small, confined space and learn that you will be there to comfort him at the end of the flight.

Image Source

 

7. Be Prepared on Moving Day

Give your dog a light meal before embarking on a car ride or flight. Consult your veterinary and find out if there are any special dietary requirements you must take into account. When you’re traveling, you should have your dog’s microchip number and medical records with you. If your dog is not traveling with you, make sure to write your name, address, and phone number on the crate.

 

8. Make Sure the New Place Is Pet-Proof

In all of the excitement and stress of moving, it’s easy to forget to check if your new home is fully prepared to house a dog. If you’re renting, make sure you have approval to bring in a pet. Not all landlords accept all types of breeds. If you’re moving into a house, you should always check the fence to make sure there are no gaps to allow your dog to sneak out and run away.

 

9. Introduce New Things Gradually

Even after the moving day is over, your dog can still experience stress and anxiety. Rather than overwhelming him with dozens of new places at once, introduce everything gradually and give him time to explore and adjust to everything at his own pace. For instance, when you go out for walks, explore the neighborhood bit by bit. Allow your dog to become familiarized with a block or two before you go any further.

 

10. Explore Safely

While your dog is still adjusting to new territory, always keep safety in mind. Use a harness and leash and help him discover things he might not have seen before. Be there for him when he meets the neighbors, both human and canine, so you can both make new friends at the same time.

Related Posts

Related Posts

| RSS feed for comments on this post

Comments are closed.