Archive for September, 2017

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Gardens are lovely places for your dog to play and relax in. Having said that, it’s also the perfect place to wreak havoc too, like digging up your strawberry plants!

Some gardens can also be dangerous to dogs because of the plants that are growing, due to harmful chemicals or sharp edges.

There are plenty things you can do to make sure your dog can have a safe sanctuary in your backyard. Here’s a few to get you started.

Make the garden exciting

Make different routes around and through your garden so your pup can have an adventure. If you have the space, create some digging spots too to give your dog a bit of stimulation. The more textures you offer your pup, the more fun it will be because it’s giving them all sorts of different experiences into one.

Dogs wee on lawns

A dogs wee can turn your beautiful green grass into horrible patches of yellow. Try and train your dog not to pee on the lawn, but if there’s nowhere else for them to go in the garden, hose the area down straight after. If that option still doesn’t work for you, think about investing in some pet zen garden grass. This is soft and fluffy just like real grass, but it’s synthetic instead, meaning your dog can pee, and nothing will get ruined. And when they do their business, just clean it up with a doggy bag like you usually would.

Plant robust plants

Playful pups can damage your delicate flowers, so if you don’t want this to happen, either create a fence around them or just take them out and replace them with something a lot more robust, than won’t die if it gets knocked around a little. Lavender is a great option and leaves your garden smelling divine.

Keep dogs away from slugs and snails

Be very wary when it’s damp outside, that your dog doesn’t come into contact with any slugs or snails. If your pup ingests these, they may get lungworm which isn’t pleasant. Symptoms include lethargy, difficulty in breathing, and coughing. If you notice any of these, take them to the vets.

Avoid toxic plants

There are many plants out there that are extremely harmful to your furry friends. Buttercups, daffodils, foxglove, oaks, tomatoes, and yew are just a few examples of what to avoid.

If you notice a change in your dog and think they may have eaten something they shouldn’t have, take them straight to the vets just to be on the safe side.

Secure your compost bin

If you have a compost bin in your garden, your dog may be very interested in it, especially if it contains scraps of old food giving off all sorts of different odours. These may be harmful to your pup though, so make sure they can’t break into it.

Keep your shed secure

If you have a shed in your garden, make sure it’s locked up and your dog has no way of getting in. You don’t want them having access to any sharp tools, electrical equipment, or harmful chemicals.

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https://www.pexels.com/photo/dog-snout-puppy-royalty-free-97082/

 

I think it’s going to be a bit of an understatement when I say that we all want our dogs to be happy and healthy, but it’s true. When I spoke about desensitizing to thunder, it made me think about stress in dogs in general. Because thunder can cause stress in dogs, or at least invoke it if they mirror my (or your) behavior as I said, but it’s not the only thing. In fact, there are lots of different things that can stress dogs out. And we know what it feels like to be stressed and anxious – it sucks. So for me, trying to stop my dogs from being distressed is highly important.

 

Spot Those Tell All Signs

 

Spotting the signs of stress is going to be the first part of you stopping them. And actually, it’s surprisingly easy. Our dogs are often creatures of habit – you can know their temperament and behaviors like the back of your hand. So noticing when they’re acting strangely can be easy.

 

They can’t tell you, but they can show you. The things that I would look out for the most are any changes in their common behaviors like having accidents or not eating. And although at first you might get stressed yourself and wonder why you have to stop your dog peeing in the house again(!), you should see it as a warning sign. Sometimes, you’ll be able to notice right away.

 

Get A Second Opinion

 

But remember that accidents or changes in temperaments or eating could be a sign of something more serious than stress. I have gotten a second opinion in the past when I’ve been worried. So if you’re not 100% sure that your pups are stressed, go and speak to your veterinarian first just in case.

 

Always Balance Everything – For The Sake Of Their Health

 

So, on to what we all can all try and do to keep that dreaded stress at bay. I would always try and figure out what the trigger is, like thunder, and remove it where possible. Although you can’t help when the weather turns, if it is anything you can control, you need to be able to do that. For me, car trips can sometimes be a trigger, so I try to limit them or at least keep them balanced. Dogs are creatures of habits, so I always try to keep them to their routine and ensure they are balanced – rather than change things up that could set them off.

 

Trying Some TLC

 

With anything, you can’t control, or if you can see that your dog is stressed, I would highly suggest giving them some TLC. Dogs respond so well to touch, and it can really calm them down. I always give my dog a big cuddle and some fuss when stress sets in, or even to try and combat it from setting in in the first place.

 

And If All Else Fails…

 

Music helps dogs to chill out and stay calm.It sounds silly, but it’s true. And I know when I’m stressed out I play some of my favorite songs to chill out too. So when you can see that they’re stressed, put on a song, and cuddle them. Believe me; it can often be the key to keeping your dog away from distress.