Archive for October, 2017

Camping is one of the most fun activities you and the family can do together. It’s a great feeling getting away from the hassles of modern life for a relaxing weekend, at one with nature with your loved ones. If, like me, when you think of your family, you think of your pet too, then you might want to consider bringing them along for the wild adventure! Our dog loves the freedom, the fresh air, and the new experiences. Your furry friend can benefit from going on a camping trip but you will need to consider some steps to ensure your dog stays safe and you all have a good time.

 

  1. Ensure Your Dog Is Properly Trained

 

The possibility of overstimulation is increased exponentially in a camping environment. The birds to chase. The crisp, fresh air. The different smells! All of it leads to your dog being more likely to run wild. Make sure your dog is trained to obey commands. Losing your dog is the one guarantee to ruin your camping trip and having your dog misbehaving could easily cause trouble for you with other campers.

 

If you’re feeling brave, or silly, and want to take a puppy camping, then make sure you are ready to spend most of your time training them, otherwise it could be a very long trip!

 

  1. Keep Your Dog’s Vaccinations Up To Date

 

This should be something you should do regularly regardless of a planned camping trip, but make sure you have this ticked off a while before your trip incase of last minute bad reactions. Here’s a few other things you should consider to ensure your dog is in tip-top condition before a fun adventure!

 

  • Make sure your dog is microchipped
  • Check your pet insurance is up to date
  • Obtain your dog’s veterinary records
  • Get your dog a check up to ensure they’re fit to travel
  • Get the number of your veterinary in case of emergency
  • Find out the nearest vet to your campsite
  • Administer preventative flea and tick treatments
  • Check leads and collars for damage
  • Pack a first aid kit (LINK: http://notquitewild.com/outdoor-gear/whats-in-a-first-aid-kit/) for your furry friend!

 

Vaccinations are not only important for the health of your dog, but also important for the health of other dogs that may be at the camp site.

 

  1. Keep Your Dog’s Feet Safe

 

Camping often involves going for long walks. Something your dog will enjoy almost as much as you. The ground however isn’t always safe. While hazards such as glass and cut up aluminium cans will be encountered far less often in the wild, other hazards like sharp sticks, sharp rocks or hot ground, will be far more plentiful. You can stick to areas, or designated paths, which have been cleared and don’t have such hazardous ground when you take your dog for a walk. Alternatively, you could always purchase some foot protectors to ensure that your dog will be safe wherever you decide to walk!

 

  1. Choose An Appropriate Tent

 

While the day time will most likely be full of fun and frivolities for you and your four legged friend, the night time won’t be quite as easy. You might well have plans for the night, but there will come a time when you need to sleep. Unless you’ve brought a camper van with you, you’ll be sleeping in a tent. You’ll need to find the best family tent (LINK: http://notquitewild.com/camping/best-family-tent-reviews/) for yourself, your family, and of course, your dog!

 

It’s not just the size of your tent you need to think about though. You need to make sure that the the material won’t rip as your dog walks around. If your dog is well trained you can limit how durable your tent will need to be, but it is inevitable that there will be some damage, so a highly durable tent is a must. You may also want to choose a tent with an outside awning for shade during the day, as your dog will definitely be napping after running around in the sun!

 

  1. Choose A Camp Site With Other Dogs

 

If it’s possible try to camp at a site that welcomes dogs. Some campsites require you to have your dog on a lead at all times, but this may not be so fun for you or your dog. Ideally, you want your dog to roam free and have fun, so dog-friendly campsites may be a better option!

 

The social aspect of the camping isn’t just important for humans. It is exactly the same for your dog. Give your dog the opportunity to make new friends, whether that’s other animals, or other people. Your dog needs to have fun as well!

 

 

The Final Word

 

Taking your family camping, including your dog, can be a relaxing activity as long as you plan carefully, and take things into consideration. Your dog will have so much fun exploring a new environment, with new sounds, and smells, and they can also be a great comfort when you’re traveling away from home. The main thing to remember when you’re taking your dog camping is to keep both you and your pet safe, and of course, to have fun!

 

 

About The Author

Heather Adams is a keen camper, hiker and writer for Not Quite Wild (LINK: http://notquitewild.com/) a resource blog for those who may not always get the opportunity to get into the wild everyday but who are wild adventurers at heart! She loves taking her family camping, and could not imagine not inviting her furry family members along for the trip!

Our pets have evolved to withstand the elements. Their long, thick fur keeps them warm, and their paws and nails help give them grip. Even with all these built-in, winter-ready features, though, they can still get a little cold when they spend time outside in frigid temperatures — especially if they’re not used to that type of climate.

As a pet parent, it’s your responsibility to ensure your pets are cozy and safe all winter long, whether they reside inside or outside of your home. The following are four of the best ways to help your pooch beat the winter chill in the most comfortable, healthy ways possible.

  1. Reconsider their Shelter

Outdoor pets might have a hard time maintaining their bodily warmth once winter temperatures roll in. This is especially true of older and/or smaller dogs, who simply aren’t built to withstand the coldest days of the season.

Even if your dogs regularly live outside, winter might be time to allow them to sleep inside, at the very least. If you’re opposed to that, you can winterize your pet’s outdoor shelter to the best of your ability. Depending on the severity of the temperatures, you can add insulation to the doghouse, buy a small heater or simply resituate it so it gets less of a draft. And, of course, if you can’t figure out a way to heat your dog’s home, then consider putting a bed inside of your home for safe, warm snoozing.

  1. Invest in a Doggy Jacket (or Let Their Hair Grow)

You don’t have to buy your pet an entire winter wardrobe, but a dog jacket could be the difference between cold and comfortable walks this winter. Again, older dogs have trouble regulating their own body temperatures; the same goes for puppies whose bodies are still growing. These two ages especially need an extra layer of warmth; smaller dogs and those with thin hair may also need a jacket or sweater to survive the season.

Longer haired dogs have a built-in jacket, but only if you don’t groom their hair too short. Once hair begins to grow long, be sure you’re regularly brushing and de-tangling it, too: knotted hair won’t be as effective as a barrier against the cold.

  1. Feed Your Pet More Heartily

Your dog uses quite a bit of energy to stay warm in cold weather, which means he or she will need more food in colder temperatures. With more calories to burn, your pooch will be able to regulate body heat with ease.

This is especially true for senior dogs. In fact, one of the best ways to help an older dog stay comfortable in general is to update his or her diet. The key element in an older dog’s diet is easily digestible protein, which helps your four-legged friend maintain muscle instead of gaining fat. This keeps your dog healthy and better able to stave off winter chills.

  1. Slip on Pup Shoes — or Minimize Time on Ice and Snow

Snow and ice can cause irritation and cracking in your pet’s paws, which is uncomfortable all on its own. But if your dog takes a walk through a salt-covered road, that can also hurt and irritates their feet. You can prevent pain by picking up a pair of snowshoes for all four of your dog’s feet. If you’re unprepared for a snowstorm and have to walk your dog barefoot, then be sure to thoroughly wash his or her feet afterward and minimize the time spent standing on icy surfaces.

Your dog is part of the family, and the above tips will allow you to treat him or her as such. A warm cozy bed, a thick jacket, a hearty diet and a pair of snowshoes are all it takes to ensure your pooch is ready for winter. All you have left to do is cuddle up on the coldest of nights and wait for spring, when everyone can play outside easily and safely one again.

 

Bio:

Emily is an avid dog lover and conservation writer from Lancaster, Pennsylvania. To read more of her work, check out her blog Conservation Folks and go follow her on Twitter!

Image via Pixabay

 

 

Everyone wants to pamper their dog and show them the love and respect they deserve for their faithful companionship.

 

Alas, not all forms of pampering are created equal, and it’s even possible that you could do your canine companion an injury by choosing the wrong way to show your affection.

 

Here’s a look at some healthy ways to pamper your dog.

 

Why pampering your dog the wrong way is dangerous

 

You might think that the very idea of pampering your dog “wrong” is silly. After all, if you’re showing affection, and Fido’s enjoying himself, what’s the harm, right?

 

Unfortunately, many of the ways that people commonly pamper their animals can be extremely detrimental to the health of the pet. Feeding a dog human snacks like chocolate can result in toxicity and lead to conditions such as diabetes, making the dog sick and frail over time.

 

In some cases, things which please humans can even prove fatal to dogs.

 

While pet insurance via a company like petsinsurance.co is a good policy for dealing with potential health issues, it should always be seen as a last resort.

 

 

Feed your dog meat and veg

 

Dogs evolved from carnivorous wolves, and despite whatever the pet food industry might want you to believe, kibble is generally a poor substitute for a dog’s naturally evolved ancestral diet.

 

If you want to make your dog bark with sheer joy and get the twinkle back in their eye and the shine in their coat, start feeding them meat mixed some green veg in place of kibble. This will ensure they’re getting the right balance of vitamins and minerals and digesting them properly.

 

Yep, it’s more expensive. And sure, it may take more preparation time. But if you’re serious about your dog’s health, it’s the only way to go.

 

 

Give your dog an approved dental bone to chew

 

Everyone knows the old cliché that dogs love to chew on bones, and we all have memories of seeing someone scraping the bones off their plate for their dog to pounce on.

 

This is a bad idea, and all pet health experts would advise against it. Cooked bones are more brittle than raw ones, and also smaller to begin with. This creates a recipe for disaster where your dog can easily damage their mouth or insides due to splintered bone shards. At worst, the results can be fatal.

 

But Rover still loves chewing, so why not invest in a vet-approved dental “bone” for your dog to chew? His gums will improve and he’ll be a very happy pup to boot.

 

 

Take your dog on long walks or runs

 

Exercise may not seem like much of a treat to the average human, but things tend to work differently for our canine companions.

 

A walk is when a dog truly gets to explore the world, mark their territory, stretch their legs, meet other dogs, and feel the primal pangs of their wolf ancestors tugging at their heartstrings.

 

For the more athletic breeds, a walk by itself won’t cut it. If you want to treat them right, keep them happy, and maintain their fitness, they’ll need to go on regular long runs.

 

It should come as no surprise that breeds like huskies — which were bred to run across vast distances on a daily basis — thrive on intense physical activity.

(Image Source)

 

When considering new ways to look after their pets, a lot of people find themselves at a loss. With all of the resources online, the support others can give, and the emotions of your pet, it can be hard to decide the best course of action. To help you out with this, this post will be going through a method which can be used to identify changes which you can make in a dog’s life.

 

This concept is simple; you just have to think about what your dog would ask for if he or she could talk. A little bit of empathy can go a long way when you’re looking after an animal. Unlike a human, they can’t vocalize the way they feel. Instead, you have to put yourself in their shoes, considering how they might feel about the way they live. You can find some examples of this the areas to consider below.

 

Like all animals, dogs are extremely susceptible to certain diseases, conditions, and other health concerns. Without the right care, this part of your dog’s life could easily leave them living with discomfort or even pain. By considering how you would feel if your health were ignored or if you were living with confusing pain you will be able to improve this area dramatically.

 

  • Vets

 

Most dogs hate going to the vets But, if you could ask if they want to be healthy or unhealthy, most would probably want to stay in the best possible shape. Of course, you probably want your dog to be healthy, as well, and there are some very easy ways to achieve this. Regular visits to your vet, along with checkups if you notice anything unusual, will limit the chances of discomfort in your dog’s life by a huge margin.

 

  • Products

 

One of the first things you would notice if your dog were to talk to you would be the stink of their breath. Thankfully, oral care for dogs is simple, and there are loads of products which can help you. Along with this, though, thinking about some supplements to improve your friend’s health could also be a great benefit. You probably take vitamins already. So, it only makes sense to pass on this healthy habit to your pets, too.

 

  • Parasites

 

Imagine living through each day with small bites all over your body. Each day, new bites form, as eggs hatch and more parasites feed on your blood. With fleas and a wide range of other nasties, your dog will be in a lot of discomfort. Looking for signs like scratching can help with this. But, you also have to be prepared to treat the issue right away.

 

It’s unlikely that health and hygiene would be on your dog’s mind for long if they were suddenly blessed with the gift of speech. Instead, they would probably be more concerned with a couple of other areas, like food, exercise, and entertainment. Dogs are too smart to be left without anything to do. Without enrichment in their life, they will often get stressed, depressed, and even frustrated.

 

  • Food

 

If you had to eat the same meal every day, you probably wouldn’t be that happy. Variety makes food exciting, and humans are very good at experiencing the wealth of different foods. Of course, your dog might not have as complex a pallet as you, but they still enjoy some change in their diet. You can often buy dog food in multipacks which contain different flavours. Along with this, though, you could also look into options like dry food or vegetables to add something different.

 

  • Walks

 

Dogs don’t get excited about going for a walk because they want go out and experience nice views or clean air. Instead, they want to hunt, and they want to do it with you, as you are what they see as their pack. This time is very important to your canine friend, and you should endeavour to go for them at least a couple of times a day. The exact frequency of walks you should take depends on the size and age of your dog.

 

  • Extra Play

 

Though they can’t talk, dogs often try to make their intentions known through other forms of communication. Unfortunately, a lot of owners fail to pick up on these attempts, and will often ignore their pet when they’re practically screaming for play. Not only does daily play exercise your dog, but it also strengthens your bond with one another.

 

Being pack animals, dogs are naturally very social creatures. They like to spend time with humans, and will often find ways to do it as often as possible. Along with this, though, most pooches will like to spend time with other dogs, too. This part of their life is very important. Without it, your dog would certainly tell you that they are lonely.

 

  • Other Dogs

 

One of the most important forms of social interaction your dog can have will be with other dogs. Unlike humans, fellow canines will be able to communicate and play in ways which work well for each other. Like people, animals will often form bonds similar to friendship with those they like. This makes it very important to try and find dogs which you can see on a regular basis so that your dog gets the time it needs.

 

  • At Home

 

Your dog won’t be able to spend all of his or her time at the park playing with other dogs. Instead, they will spend most of their time with you, making it very important that you socialise with them as best you can. Websites like TheSpruce can help you to learn about dog communication. This should give you a good idea of what you need to do to be able to give your dog the time it needs.

 

Hopefully, this post will give you a good idea of what can be done when you’re looking for ways to improve the life of your dog. By putting yourself in their position, it will be a lot easier for you to see the areas that are lacking in their life. Of course, though, you also have to think about this from a couple of other angles, too.

5 Tips For Taking Care Of A Blind Dog

A dog can become blind at any age for a variety of reasons. A genetic defect can cause a dog to be born blind. Injuries or accidents can cause blindness in dogs of all ages. Senior dogs commonly lose partial or full eyesight in their late life years. Blindness for dogs doesn’t mean they can’t live a quality life. It just means you should be knowledgeable and equipped to handle taking care of a blind dog.

When taking care of a blind dog there are a few things to keep in mind to best help your blind dog adapt. The dog may not be able to see but his other senses can be used to their advantage. Their sense may even be heightened or appear that way.

Give Your Blind Dog Space

This can be a corner of the living room or under the kitchen table. Have a safe place for your blind dog to retreat and rest. Keep its food and bedding in the same area and the dog will start to understand this is its personal area.

Create Noise for Your Blind Dog

Your voice and the tone you use will give the blind dog information on what you want it to do. It gives the blind dog a general direction your voice is coming from. You can also teach blind dog directional commands by voice and redirection. Teach the dog “left”, “right”, “wait” and it can quickly navigate with your direction. Using a whistle, clicker or clapping could also be used to teach the blind dog to map out its living area.

Block Hazards

Blind dogs can’t see the danger of a flight of stairs, walking out the front door or wandering around an unattended pool. Keep your blind dog safe by fencing in pool areas, entryways or stairways that it could exit through or tumble down.

Encourage Your Blind Dog to Explore

Using treats, sounds and smells can help coax a blind dog to explore past its normal comfort zone. Rewarding him and cheering it on can boost the blind dogs self-esteem. Squeaky toys are a great way to get a blind dogs attention. A ball with a bell inside allows a blind dog to follow the sound and fetch the balls.

Keep a Great Attitude

The more “normal” you keep things while taking care of a blind dog the better. If you are sad for the dog it will become sad and depressed. Continue the dogs normal routine of regular walks and trips to the dog park. Speak to the dog lovingly and taking care of a blind dog becomes a breeze.

 

Many dogs go blind at some point in their lifetime. Stay prepared for taking care of a blind dog by following these 5 tips.