Archive for Dog Behavior

How to Help Cats and Dogs Get Along

If you already own a cat and are planning on introducing a dog into the family (or vice versa!), it is important to know right off the bat that chances are low for the two of them to just get along.

By nature, dogs are hunters, which means that they might see your cat as a form of prey; the exception being dogs that have been around other cats in the past and not had any problems with them.

However, if you are bringing home a puppy that has never had any experience with them, or if you are bringing home an adult dog that has a high desire to chase and catch, then you will need to work to ensure harmony in your home.

Don’t think cats are innocent, either! Many times cats will feel threatened by a dog’s mere presence, causing them to lash out by scratching or trying to mark their territory (in not-so-subtle ways). Cats can be just as loyal to their humans as dogs can – and they typically hate when their daily routines are upset by anything.

In either case, the stress from new arrival can wreak havoc on both parties. It can cause sickness, such as lack of appetite, vomiting, and hair loss to either or both of the animals, not to mention the fact that the stress on either animal isn’t fair to them – after all, the current pet is used to being there first, and everything belongs to him or her, and now you’re asking them to share with a new arrival!

Let’s take a lot at some ways we can work to help cats and dogs get along, and alleviate all of that stress and tension that might pop up in this situation.

Introductions

The very first time your cat and dog meet it is vital to introduce them in a calm, relaxing manner. Don’t just place the two of them together on the floor – make sure you are holding your dog or cat as you introduce them to the new arrival. Let them sniff each other and stare at each other – and don’t expect the initial encounter to go too smoothly – time can change things!

After the introduction, make sure to keep the animals separate for a while. You can either keep them in separate rooms or put up a divider. Whatever you decide on, after a while you should make sure to allow them the chance to smell each other or interact – even if it is only though a small opening cut on the bottom of the divider.

If you are putting them in separate rooms, make sure to change what rooms you put them in. This will not only give them a change of scenery, but it will also allow your pets to smell each other’s presence in the room, thereby getting used to one another.

Repeat this process a few times if necessary, giving them time to get used to each other and the fact that they will be spending time together now.

Reducing Problem Behaviors

If your cat and dog are starting to get along, but still have several behaviors that are somewhat of a problem, try and reduce these behaviors in a positive way.

For example, if your dog likes to bark at your cat, then be sure to distract your dog instead of scolding or using a harsh tone. Offer your dog a toy or show him or her something of interest. By trying to distract from the behavior rather than react negatively, you are helping ensure that there will be more positive encounters in the future.

If you yell at your harshly scold your pet, it will remember the interaction and how it was treated negatively, preventing him or her from wanting to engage in the future.

Keep Food, Water, Sleeping, and Litter Separate

A key component to your pets existing harmoniously is to make sure that their food and drinks stay separate from each other.

Don’t allow your dog or cat near each other’s food dishes – their automatic feeders, trays, and water dishes are for them, and them only.

The same can be said for the pets’ sleeping areas. Allow your cat and your dog to have their own designated areas for sleeping – it will give them a sense of security knowing that they won’t be bothered.

Another thing to remember is to keep your cat’s litter box away from your dog – cats will get territorial if they believe their safe space is threatened, and this includes spraying or urinating in other areas of the house if their litter box is disturbed. This is their safe space for going to the bathroom, so make sure to keep it feeling safe for them!

Some Other Tips for Helping Your Pets Adjust

You may be tempted to give your cat and dog each their own water and food dishes, beds, and then leave them alone together until they “get used to each other.” However, this isn’t the way you should help your pets to adjust. Make sure the animals are one hundred percent comfortable with each other before you do this – as it can end poorly if one of the animals turns hostile.

Always make sure to reward good behavior, either with praise or treats. If your pets can play together or sit together nicely without fighting or attacking each other, they deserve that praise! Reward positive behavior!

Allow your cat to have somewhere he or she can go to get away from the dog if necessary. Either a cat tree or a special room that only he or she can get into are both good choices, as this provides the cat a feeling of safety and the reassurance that if it feels threatened, it has somewhere to go to be alone. Always make sure that neither animal is afraid of the other before leaving them alone in the house or overnight.

Also keep in mind how different breeds can get along – whereas breeds like German Shepherds, Sheep Dogs, and Pit Bulls might see the cat as an animal that needs to be “herded” or as “prey,” dogs such as Labrador Retrievers or even smaller dogs might be more willing to accept this member of the family, due to their sweeter and more mellow personality.

Many households have cats and dogs that coexist wonderfully, and even play together happily. Following proper protocol when introducing your pets and allowing them time to get used to each other is crucial to keep them healthy and happy, and having the whole family get along well!

BIO: Emily Parker runs Catological, a blog dedicated to helping cat parents love their kitties better. She has lived in both dog and cat homes, and is excited to introduce a new dog to her family (which includes 2 cats) in the coming year.

Why are dogs so friendly?

If someone asked you the question why are dogs so friendly? How would you answer them? Yes we all know and love our dogs, and they love as back just as much, but where did this love come from? Where did it all begin? Let’s dip in and discover the answer to this question, which is truly amazing.

Why are dogs so friendly – The domestication Process

 

It’s hard to imagine, as you’re cuddling up to your beloved canine that his/her ancestors were wolves. Scientists have clear DNA evidence that shows our best friends did in fact descend from the gray wolf.

The oldest fossils that have been discovered were from a dog grave which was 14,000 years old. However there is clear DNA evidence that does indeed suggest that dogs originated from wolves a lot sooner than this; with figures going back 15,000 to over 100,000 years ago.

Historians have all agreed that we domesticated our faithful companions long before any other animal. So not only are dogs our best friends they are indeed our oldest best friends. Is it any wonder why we have such an unbreakable bond with them?

We don’t exactly know how dogs and humans first discovered each other, there are many different theories. One theory is that humans began taking in the pups of wolves and that we learned how to tame them. Another theory suggests that the very tamest wolves were always around us searching for food, they were the ones who weren’t afraid to come close to us in the hope for food which would have increased their chances of survival.

One of the Pack

Wolves are pack animals and as they became tamer towards us we were considered by them to be the pack leader, or the “highest ranking wolf” the wolves therefore quickly became obedient towards the new pack leader. The tamer the wolves kept on becoming, the longer they stayed around us, and so either we intentionally bred tamer wolves, or evolution did it for us. The end result was much tamer wolves, until eventually we got our best friends of today, the dog.

Humans and the tamer wolves built up a strong bond and developed great teamwork in regards to hunting, we had the brains for hunting and the wolf had the speed and also the ferocity, which enabled us both to survive. We shared our food that we had caught together, and we depended on each other for survival. This is where the bond between us stems from, we needed each other. This is one answer to the question why are dogs so friendly towards us?

Our little wolves of today

While we may not have been able to cuddle a wolf back in those dayswe can cuddle our best friends that we share our lives with today, they are very special indeed. Although we may not have to go hunting together for each other’s survival, we still share a great bond and it’s a bond that can never be broken. We love our dogs and they love us back, just as much.

They consider us as one of their pack, just like the wolves did all those years ago, some characteristics will never change, and we wouldn’t want them to. It’s hard to imagine our faithful companions being related to a gray wolf, but indeed it is true, take a close look at your dog, the features are all there to see.

The loyalty of dogs

Dogs are such loyal companions to us humans, is there any wonder they are considered to be man’s best friend? You only have to look at stories in the newspapers to see stories of such loyalty, when their owners have been away for a long time and suddenly come home, the pictures of the dog’s reaction is beautiful, and shows just how much they love us, unconditionally. Some people might say they are loyal because we feed them this however, definitely isn’t the truth. They love us for much more than this.

Dogs are pack animals, they think that their owners are one of their pack. Dogs don’t want to be on their own, they need numbers, as they thrive in a pack. When something happens to one of their pack, they miss that member considerably.

Dogs are affectionate animals they have a strong instinct in them that craves bonds either with other dogs or indeed us humans. Dogs don’t want to fight they want to be loved and they want to protect all the members in their pack, no matter what.

Final thoughts

Dogs are our most loyal, trusting friends to whom we have developed such a strong bond. They love us no matter what, and we love them for this.The friendship we have with our beloved canines goes back thousands of years, so it shouldn’t be too hard to see why they quickly became “man’s best friend.”

The unconditional love they give us means everything, and they ask for nothing back, just food, shelter and lots of love .They want us to be a member of their pack, and we are more than happy to be, we will always have a strong bond with dogs, we have taken them into our hearts, and surely that’s where they’ll stay. Hopefully this has answered your question, why are dogs so friendly?

 

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Author Bio

Julie Page first grew to love writing about pets and the pet industry in 2012 while writing a dog travel journal for a Canadian based company. Julie then discovered a lack of informative dog name websites when researching puppy names for boys which fuelled her passion even more. Julie founded two quality sites www.femaledognames.net and www.maledognames.net .When Julie isn’t writing she is on an adventure, or at the very least plotting her next one.

When you place your disabled pet in a wheelchair for the first time it can go very smoothly or it can go very bad. Some pets just pick up on it like they’re so used to it but some will resist it like it’s a living hell. If this happens, don’t panic. As I have discovered from checking wheelchair blogs it is usually because your pet is not yet accustomed to the wheelchair. When faced with something they are not used to some pets freeze, retreat, or get really angry.

So all you need to do is to get your pet accustomed to the wheelchair. It sounds simple enough and it could be that simple or it could take a long time and a lot of patience. This will depend on your pet and your patience.

To get your pet accustomed to the wheelchair put it somewhere they often can see. May be near where they eat or sleep. If you think it is no longer an eyesore to them, show them how it works by moving it around and let them touch it. Once they get used to that, place your pet inside the wheelchair but keep it in place. Do not walk them yet. Just let your pet take it in that he’s in the wheelchair. When he seems comfortable, remove your pet from the wheelchair. Each step can take from a day to several days before your pet will get comfortable so, like I said, be patient. It’s up to you to see if he’s ok or not with each step. But if you are patient and persistent, soon your pet will move little by little on his own when you put him in the wheelchair.

Bio:

Marie Malacaman is the web administrator for Best Friend Mobility. She is a professional dog walker and pet sitter.

Many dogs suffer stress when they’re confronted with loud noises from fireworks or thunderstorms. Other dogs feel stress when they travel or when there are unusual things going on in the home such as workers visiting or a new pet in the family. Even a trip to the vet can cause a dog to become anxious and worried. There are all kinds of situations that can make dogs nervous. In these situations a calming collar can sometimes help calm and relax a dog. Even dogs in shelters and rescues have benefited from wearing calming collars.

How do calming collars work?
Currently there are two kinds of calming collars, though they work in similar ways.

Herbal collars
The first kind of calming collar uses fragrant herbs to calm and soothe your dog. The herbs are carefully chosen for their soothing qualities. These collars usually have cloth overlaying the collar underneath so the herbs can be sewn inside. This kind of calming collar is based on aromatherapy. The herbs are typically dried herbs so they do not contain essential oils that might irritate your dog’s skin. Collars that contain dried herbs usually continue to work for about 3-4 months.

DAP collars
The other kind of calming collar available now is a DAP (dog appeasing pheromone) collar. These collars work the same way that other DAP products work. Dog appeasing pheromones are pheromones that mimic the scent that mother dogs release when puppies are nursing. These pheromones are very soothing and calming to dogs. While many DAP products release these pheromones intermittently, when your dog wears a DAP calming collar, the pheromones are released in a sustained fashion. These collars typically last for about 30 days. They are usually plastic collars that can easily be adjusted to fit your dog. The pheromones are in the plastic of the collar and your dog’s body heat helps release them.

Both kinds of calming collars have proven to be effective with dogs who have stress and anxiety issues. Your dog simply wears the calming collar like an ordinary collar, especially when he might be facing a situation that would make him nervous. You should remove the collar before giving your dog a bath. Manufacturers usually suggest that you should not use these collars if your dog has skin lesions or irritated skin. The collars are non-toxic and your dog won’t be harmed if he chews on them though, of course, you should discourage any collar chewing.

Other therapies
If you have a dog who is afraid of thunder, fireworks, or who has other problems with stress and anxiety, calming collars are a good way to help reduce your dog’s initial stress. However, they are not a permanent solution. They don’t solve your dog’s problem. But they are a great way to help your dog stay calmer and feel better. This often makes it easier to work on a long-term solution to your dog’s issues. Calming collars are even good for working with dogs who have problems with separation anxiety. Once a dog begins to calm down and feel less fearful, it is much easier to work on some behavior modification solutions

Dogs are truly man’s best friend. They greet us each day with wagging tails and slobbery tongues, hoping for a walk or game of fetch. They love snuggling up on the sofa and they may even bring your shoes over when they want to go outside. Dogs are loving and affectionate creatures, so it is important that we reciprocate. Thankfully, dogs aren’t like humans in the sense that they hold grudges or talk behind your back; making dogs happy is actually quite simple. Here are some ways you can boost your reputation with your own dog and canines the world over.

Wear a Treat Utility Belt

If there’s one thing we know about dogs, it’s that they love to eat. Anytime, anywhere, they’re always ready to chow down. If you’re familiar with the DC Comics superhero Batman, you know he has a utility belt filled with gadgets to help him fight crime, such as the Batarang and grappling hooks. Like Batman, you should have your own utility belt to help you fight hunger for doggies. If you’re on a walk, have a couple for your dog(s), but also be ready to give some to dogs you meet along the way – you’ll make a new friend for life!

Know Your Dog Breeds

You don’t need to be an expert on every dog in the world, but it doesn’t hurt to know some basic breed facts. For example, if certain dogs tend to be more aggressive toward strangers, you know not to approach them if it’s the first time you’re meeting, or to make any abrupt movements that may alarm them. If you know that certain dogs need a lot of exercise, make sure they get it. Think of how much you appreciate when someone knows you and all of your preferences – it means a lot to you and you value that individual. Dogs feel the same way when you comprehend and acknowledge their needs.

Set Aside Snuggle Time

Dogs love to cuddle! Don’t deprive your buddy of one-on-one love and affection. You can’t realistically do this all the time because you have your family, work, social life, etc., but you should always make time for belly rubs and ear scratches.

Walk Frequently

This is a given, but it’s worth mentioning. Dogs need exercise just like humans do. Develop a schedule and stick to it so your dog gets to release energy and has something to look forward to.

Be Spontaneous

Instead of your normal evening walk, head to the dog park. If you have a greenbelt nearby, walk there instead of the usual neighborhood route. Head for the hills and have a picnic on your day off. There are a million different things you can do – make it fun! You don’t want to do the same things over and over and over again, and neither does your dog.

Now that you know how to treat your canine companions, go and do! If you continue to nurture your relationship, you’ll create a strong bond and many lasting memories.

Ron Rutherford loves dogs, fresh peach pie, and a rousing game of pinnacle. He writes for Havahart Wireless, manufacturers of invisible electric fencing for dogs.

Separation anxiety in dogs can be a serious condition that causes a dog to have anxiety and behavior problems. Many dogs are temporarily sad when they are left alone but most of them have the coping skills necessary to soothe or entertain themselves until their owner returns. You may feel very guilty when you go to work in the morning and your dog looks at you with pitiful eyes, but chances are that your dog spends the day playing and napping. Some dogs, however, have such problems with anxiety that they don’t relax until their owner returns.

 

Symptoms of separation anxiety

A dog that truly has separation anxiety will display the following symptoms:

 

  • Barking and howling when the owner leaves – and it continues more than 15 minutes
  • Seeking contact with things that belong to the owner, such as clothing, for comfort
  • Drooling and panting
  • Soiling in the house from anxiety
  • Ignoring other people in the home when the owner is absent
  • Wanting to see and touch the owner when the owner is home
  • Ignoring toys, chews, and other things meant to comfort the dog
  • Digging in the house, chewing in the house, and destroying furniture out of anxiety

 

As you can see, separation anxiety can be emotionally distressing, not just for the dog, but also for the dog’s human family. It can also lead to many destructive behaviors in the home.

 

Although many people think their dog has separation anxiety because their dog may become “anxious” when they leave the house, remember that true separation anxiety is a serious anxiety condition. It is more than a dog that is simply sad or temporarily upset when you leave the house. Virtually all dogs display some emotion when their people leave home.

 

What causes separation anxiety?

Separation anxiety is more common in dogs that have been taken from their mothers and littermates at an early age. It is also more common in dogs from animal shelters and other dogs that have had an unstable start in life. The more emotional security a dog has at an early age, the better. Any dog that has been through a lot of changes and upheavals can show signs of separation anxiety.

 

How to help your dog with separation anxiety

One way of helping your dog with separation anxiety is through desensitization. This approach is most helpful for dogs that have mild cases of separation anxiety. In essence, you can get your dog to become used to being left alone for short periods of time and gradually increase the time he spends alone until he feels all right being alone. However, it can take a long time to work up to the point where your dog feels okay being alone all day.

 

You can start desensitizing your dog by picking up your car keys or purse – something your dog associates with you leaving the house. Your dog probably starts becoming anxious at this point. Then put them back down. You can praise your dog when he relaxes. Keep working on this one item until your dog seems relaxed when you pick it up. Then move on to going to the door. Again, your dog will probably be anxious when he sees you going to the door. Instead of going outside, sit back down. Praise your dog when he’s relaxed again. Again, it can take some time before your dog is relaxed when he sees you going to the door. If you continue in this manner, you can gradually work up to the point of going for a short ride in your car and returning. Praise your dog when he is relaxed about you taking this short ride. You can slowly increase the length of time you are gone. When your dog can stand for you to be gone for more than 45 minutes, he should be all right with you being gone for longer periods without feeling anxious.

 

Desensitization works for mild cases of separation anxiety. If your dog has a more severe form of separation anxiety you will probably need to work with a canine behaviorist. You should talk to your veterinarian and see if he or she can recommend someone. Frequently a canine behaviorist will also recommend that a dog take a short course of anti-anxiety medication during training. Your vet can prescribe this medication. The medication calms your dog’s anxiety enough so that he can learn new, more productive behavior. You will not have to continue to give your dog medication after the training is complete.

Helping Your Dog With Socialization

Whether you have a new puppy or an adult dog, or whether you have a dog from an animal shelter or from a breeder, one thing that all dogs share is a need for good socialization. Socialization helps the dog learn the social skills he needs to deal with other dogs and with humans. It helps dogs know how to behave in public. Well-socialized dogs learn about the world and develop a self-confidence that helps them in every aspect of their lives.

 

Socializing a puppy

The easiest time to socialize a dog is when he’s a puppy. This is because puppies don’t have any fears yet. You can introduce your puppy to everything for the first time and help him have good experiences. If he is reluctant about something or afraid, you can show him that there’s nothing to fear and help build his confidence.

 

Some of the things that you should introduce your puppy to in the home include the following:

 

  • TVs
  • Radios and stereos
  • Vacuum cleaners
  • Kitchen appliances (dishwasher, blenders, other things that are noisy)

 

If your puppy is fearful of some of these things, such as the vacuum, you can encourage him to investigate it when it’s turned off. Let him play around it. Praise him and give him treats. Do not scare him with the vacuum or other things that could frighten him. Instead, show him that they won’t hurt him even when they are making noise. Don’t force your puppy to be close to these objects if he is scared. Let him get used to them and praise and reward him when he is relaxed around them.

 

For other common house and yard items, such as the lawn mower or weed eater, you should not encourage your puppy to get too close to them since they can be dangerous. However, you can praise and reward him for being calm when you use them.

 

Outside the home you can take your puppy to places where puppies and dogs are welcome so they can meet friendly strangers. Some people like to take their dog to pet supply stores that welcome dogs so people can pet them. You can also take your puppy to the park if dogs are welcome there. It’s best to avoid the dog park with a young puppy since some dogs can play too roughly and your puppy could be hurt. Dog parks can also be a place where canine diseases are passed so please don’t take your puppy there if he has not had his vaccinations.

 

One excellent way to socialize puppies is by enrolling them in a puppy preschool or puppy kindergarten class. These classes are often offered by pet supply stores, dog trainers, and kennel clubs. You can probably find one in your area. They are aimed at young puppies so they can gain some socialization with other puppies, have some interaction with other people, and learn some basic good manners. They are highly recommended. A puppy who goes to puppy preschool class will be ready to start a good basic obedience class when he’s a little older.

 

Socializing an older dog

Socializing an older dog can be a little harder but it can still be done. If you have obtained an adult dog from an animal shelter or from a breeder, you can cover the same things you would cover with a puppy. Try to find out if the dog has any particular fears or problems that you need to address. For example, some dogs can be fearful about men in hats. You’ll need to keep this in mind, especially if you encounter any men in hats. It might take some time for you to help your dog overcome this issue. Do not force your dog to meet men in hats. This will only make your dog more fearful. Instead, you can let your dog get used to hats, meet women in hats, meet men who put hats on and take them off, and so on. This can be a slow process and some dogs might never overcome this kind of issue. But this gives you some idea of the things you can do. You should praise and reward your dog for any small progress. And remember not to do anything to force your dog or scare him further.

 

Older dogs often benefit from a good obedience training class with their owner. Being in a class setting with a good teacher and learning new lessons often helps the dog build confidence which, in turn, is a good way to help with the dog’s socialization.

Your dog may be your best friend, but he is also his own person, er, canine. He may snuggle with you in your bed, nuzzle you with his cold nose and give you plenty of love. But remember that he won’t do things just because you ask him to. There has to be something in it for him. Usually, it’s toys, food, dog treats, excitement in your voice etc.

This is particularly evident when you’re training your canine friend to move without you, during agility training. You may usually need a toy to motivate your dog during training. But some dogs don’t respond to toys, and respond to food instead. Other dogs are motivated by the sound of your voice. Figuring out what motivates him will make training much easier for you.

Motivation With Dog Treats

Many dogs respond to food, but not always their regular puppy food. Dog treats that your puppy chomps down and clears up in seconds will give you the best results. Treats can include sliced boiled eggs, turkey and chicken. These treats can be both a reward as well as a trigger for certain commands that you’re trying to teach your dog. For instance, if you are trying to teach him obey the command ‘leave it alone’, you can hold the treat in your hand so that he comes over and sniffs, in an attempt to find the treat. If you say ‘leave it alone’ and he draws back, then you can reward him with the treat. You will need a reward for all types of training, and dog treats work well.

How To Motivate Your Dog With Toys

Many dogs have their favorite toys – a rubber ball, a miniature rubber bone, a plush toy or even a chew toy. These toys can be both a trigger and a reward and get your dog to respond. Ignore the toys that your dog doesn’t feel particularly fond of. Focus instead on the toys that he gets excited about – not too excited though, or else he won’t be able to focus on the training.

 

If toys don’t get him excited at all but he loves food, then you could simmer a toy in chicken broth or with some liver. But be careful – don’t leave him alone with this delicious smelling object or he might actually eat it! You don’t want to have to surgically remove it from his gut.

Show That You Are Having Fun

If you’re stony faced and seem bored out of your wits when training your puppy, he will catch on and won’t want to join. Be sure to show lots of excitement during the session with your adorable pup, no matter how exasperating he can sometimes get with not responding to simple commands. Be motivational, not punishing. When he does what you want, give him plenty of applause. You could even exaggerate your excitement a little, but only depending on your dog’s temperament. Remember, he’s like a child. The more fun he has doing something, the more he’d want to do it again.

Some sensitive and shy dogs can get frightened by loud noises and sudden movements. With such dogs, you should adopt a friendly and even voice, speaking and clapping softly and not moving unnecessarily. Be gentle and you’ll find your dog responding positively to the training.

On the other hand, there are some dogs that are too excitable, and a single whistle or excited calls can set off a manic crazy-eyed race around the grounds. Be gentle with such temperamental dogs too or you could end up getting nowhere.

Other Tips To Motivate Your Dog

You should know when to stop. After some time, even the most motivated dog will get tired of playing games. When he starts getting distracted easily and keeps stopping, you should recognize the signs. Stop just before this point and give him a little rest. You can always go back to training in an hour or so after he’s rested.

Motivating your pet is about getting him to do what you want, something that he has fun doing and would do again. Never use treats and praises to get him to do something that he hates (such as getting into the tub when he hates water). And always be sure to have fun training your new, loving, loyal, furry friend!

 

Author bio:

Diana Smith is a full time mom of two beautiful girls and a proud owner of her two dogs – german sheppard Billy and moody poodle Sam. She is interested in topics related to alternative medicine for pets. Useful information for this article has been kindly provided by Stefmar.

How aptly do you know your canine companion sitting on your lounge? Why is he acting strange sometimes? Is your canine doing it on purpose or just desire to make fun of you? The days you are with your dogs do not guarantee how good you know them as well as their strange practices. Let’s try to know some fantastic dog facts and know them more than what their wagging tail seems to say.

Dog fact number One: When your canine companion chases his/her tail, he needs help from the vet.

Many reasons clarify why dogs chase their tail: exercise, predatory instinct, worry or presence of fleas. Nevertheless, to speak with your nearest animal hospital is the safest and surest method to get the real reason why your dog keeps chasing his/her tail.

Dog fact number 2: Dogs dream at night.

Do not be dismayed if you witness your dog barking or moving his/her feet while asleep. He/she may have been chasing his/her dearest at the park in his/her dream. Humans and dogs partake the same SWS (slow wave sleep) as well as REM (rapid eye movement) while asleep. So let him/her experience the moment to enjoy twitching while the eyes are closed.

Dog fact number Three: They can see things in the dark.

Have you ever wondered how they seem to go liberally at night? How did they even get robbers trying to steal your valuables when the sun has gone down? Well, your canine companions have tapetum lucidum, which enables them to see even when it’s dark.

Canine fact number 4: If he/she is acting odd, go find your umbrella.

Although experts have not yet found the secret behind this, but according to Petside.com, dogs can determine the weather especially when it’s going to rain. So, the next time you witness your dog acting funny, go get the umbrella immediately. Besides, it pays to be prepared at all cost.

Canine fact number 5: Dogs don’t sweat like people do.

Dogs cannot sweat just anywhere. As a matter of fact, dogs only sweat on their pads. When you realize that their paw pads are sweating, you get the impression that the room is a bit warm for them remain.

Dog fact number Six: Your canine companion’s nose is wet because he/she is absorbing scent.

Popularly known to be the captain of scent, dogs secrete a mucous on their nose to help them recognize the scent (more accurately than we do). When their noses get wet, they would lick them to sample the scent they have absorbed with their mouth.

Canine fact number 7: They are the chief of scent.

Dogs can determine the scent 100,000 times more accurate than humans. No wonder why even the FBI and peace order departments of our local government seek help from them in searching unwanted items in many public places. This also explains why when you leave your cookies unattended; you would be left with nothing but the plate.

There are many things that you do not understand about your pet so do not carelessly judge them by the way they behave or kick after peeing in your garden. Most of the bizarre stuffs they do may really be funny but it is always ideal to see your vet on a regular basis.

Author’s bio:

Would you like to know more about your pet and pet neutering?
Visit http://www.hopianimalhospital.com/ and talk with a team dedicated to provide pet care services for the wellbeing of your pets.

Whether you live in the city or the suburbs, or even out in the sticks, barbecues are one of the events that define the summer months. Grilling chicken, burgers, or hotdogs with some delicious side dishes and cold drinks – what could be better on a lazy summer afternoon? Your dog thinks so, too!

If you’re one of the many Americans who will be cooking outside this summer, there are some things you can do to make your barbecue safer for your dog.

  • Be sure to secure gates to your yard before your guests arrive. Check them as guests arrive and leave and then once again after everyone leaves. You don’t want your dog to accidentally slip out of your yard during any confusion while people are coming and going.
  • If you’re expecting guests for a cookout, consider keeping your dog indoors. There are lots of potential accidents that can occur around a barbecue grill. Plus, some dogs have trouble controlling themselves when they see people trying to balance food in their laps. Your dog might get in trouble with your friends. If you know your dog has bad manners, keep him inside.
  • If your dog stays outside while you cook out, make sure you put away sharp objects such as barbecue forks. Put food wrappers in a covered trash container immediately so your dog won’t be tempted to eat them. And, be especially careful with any food, cooked or uncooked. Dogs are notorious for snatching food when you’re not looking. You could discover that your dog has stolen five pounds of hamburger meat for your burgers and eaten it before you even noticed it was missing.
  • If possible, put your dog on a long leash and put someone in charge of him. This way he’ll be part of the gathering without being able to get in trouble.
  • You can also keep your dog entertained – and your guests, too – with some fun games while everyone is waiting to eat. Consider providing your guests with a Frisbee or some other toys that your dog likes to play with. Your dog and your guests can have a lot of fun while you grill. These games can be especially fun if you or your guests have children.
  • Once everyone starts eating, don’t forget about your dog. The grill is still hot and dogs can easily burn their paws or muzzles trying to reach something that smells good.

If your dog has had some obedience training and he knows the “down-stay,” you can put him in a long down-stay outside with your guests. Remember to reward him for being good! It’s hard for a dog to resist the tempting aromas that come from the barbecue grill.

Most dogs love a happy gathering as much as people do. Add some food cooking over a fire, and your dog will be delighted when you barbecue. If you take the precautions suggested here, your dog should be safe when you cook out this summer.