Archive for Dog Nutrition

Pet owners really love their cats and dogs. Unfortunately, they often equate their own needs with that of the pet’s needs. All humans need food, companionship, water and sleep. Animals, just like humans, need to live a healthy life that includes regular exercise and proper nutrition.

From birth through old age, our nutritional needs change. As a baby, you drank formula and slowly graduated to solid foods. Pets are much like humans in that they require certain nutrients at different times in their lives. Switching your dog’s food may be necessary for a variety of reasons, such as digestive troubles or maybe, the brand is no longer sold. In addition to these issues, there are other reasons why it may be necessary to make a change in your dog’s diet. Continue reading to learn more about these reasons and how to introduce a new pet food into your pet’s diet.

Dog Enters a Different Stage of Life

There are three distinct stages in a dog’s life according to pet experts and veterinarians. The first stage is the puppy stage. During this stage, a puppy is actively growing and needs more protein and calories than the other stages of growth. Pet food for this stage of your puppy’s life is generally labeled as a “growth” formula or “puppy” food. The Association of American Feed Control Officials, also known as AAFCO, sets strict standards concerning the nutrients contained in this type of formula. It is imperative that you give a growing dog this type of pet food. Otherwise, your pet’s growth may be stunted or an illness may occur.

The second stage of life for a dog is called adult life. During this stage, the adult dog no longer needs the extra calories or protein that puppies need because they are no longer growing. Pets in this stage of life can become overweight if they do not receive enough exercise or are allowed to continue to eat puppy food. You want a food that is rated as an adult to help protect against obesity that can be detrimental to the health of your pet. There are pet foods that are marketed as pet food for all the stages of your pet’s life. These type of foods should be avoided as they contain excess calories, nutrients and fats that can lead to obesity.

The last stage of your pet’s life is considered senior life. During this stage of their life, pets may experience medical issues that require changes in their diet. If you pet has mobility issues, your vet may recommend a pet food that contains fatty acids to help lubricate their joints. If your pet suffers from kidney or heart disease, it is especially important that they are fed a pet food that is specifically made for these diseases. Unfortunately, the AAFCO does not have a formula specifically made for the senior pet. So, look for an adult formula that says that it is recommended for senior pets.

Pets are considered to be in the senior stage of life when they reach 7 to 8 years old. During this stage in your pet’s life, they will need a formula that offers extra immune and joint support to help them remain healthy and happy throughout their mature years.

Activity Levels

Another reason that you may need to switch to a different dog food is your dog’s activity level. Much like humans, the more active your pet is, the more calories it will need. Conversely, if your pet lives a sedentary lifestyle, he will require fewer calories. You want to ensure your pet is receiving the calories she needs without consuming too many that can lead to obesity. Read your pet food label to help you determine the number of calories in each serving size to ensure you pet is getting the proper nutrition.

Special Needs

Some dogs suffer from food sensitivities. Others have health problems that require different nutritional requirements. For this reason, it is important that your pet has regular veterinarian visits. During these visits, discuss your pet’s nutritional requirements and ask your vet to recommend a food based on their unique needs.

Different pet food formulas contain different nutrients. You want one that will supply your dog with the nutrition he needs during each stage of life. For example, if your pet has mobility issues or skin problems, you want a formula that contains essential fatty acids. Look for a dog food that contains both Omega-3 fatty acids and Omega-6 fatty acids, as they work together to ensure that your pet’s joints stay lubricated and their coats remain shiny and healthy.

If your pet seems weak or lethargic, schedule a visit to your veterinarian to ensure that your beloved pooch is receiving the nutrients he needs.

Another common problem in pets is gastrointestinal upset. This generally is due to a food sensitivity or stress. If you pet is suffering from upset stomach, constipation or diarrhea, it is essential that you take him to see the vet. He will get to the bottom of the problem and may recommend changing what you feed your pet.

Proper nutrition is one of the best ways to ensure that your pet lives a long, healthy life. If you suspect you need to change you dog’s diet, consult your veterinarian as sudden changes in your pet’s diet can lead to further complications. Proper nutrition throughout all the stages of your dog’s life will help ensure that your pet has a happy, healthy life.

Martyn Williams is a record-holding extreme explorer, author and successful entrepreneur. He is a yoga teacher and practices natural and Ayurveda healing. To learn more, check out his site, Haritaki.org.

There is no feeling that’s more amazing than adding a new puppy or dog to your family. There’s excitement, lots and lots of love, and, of course, a small amount of nervousness. Bringing a new pet into your home isn’t something to take lightly, after all, dogs are for life. Some breeds can live for up to 20 years, so it’s essential that you’re sure about it before you adopt a new furbaby to bring home. Unless you’re 100 percent sure that you can give your new pup a home for life, don’t bring him or her home.

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Photo source

 

The number one reason that dogs are put in shelters or abandoned is due to money. A lot of people make the mistake of thinking that money isn’t something to think about when it comes to adopting a puppy. But the truth is it’s an incredibly important factor. That’s why, before you adopt a puppy or dog, it’s essential that you’re sure you can afford to look after them. To help you do that, we’ve put together this handy guide explaining all the costs that come with owning a dog.

 

Monthly food bills

The cost of the food pills for your dog will depend on various factors; from the breed to the age of the dog. Larger breeds tend to eat more food than smaller breeds, which makes their monthly food bill more expensive.

For example, a small breed dog like a Jack Russell tends to cost between $20 to $30 a month to feed. While a larger breed, like a Labrador Retriever, tends to cost between $40 and $60 a month to feed. So make sure to take the breed into account when working out how much they will cost to care for.

 

Training and daycare

If you want your new family member to be happy and well behaved, it’s essential that you take them to training classes. This allows you to establish who is in charge and learn the best ways to teach and discipline your dog. Most beginner dog training courses cost between $10 and $13 a lesson, or around $70 for a block of classes. This doesn’t change depending on the breed; this is a set amount.

Then there’s doggie daycare services to take into account. You see, if you’re out at work all day and can’t leave your new family member at home, you’ll require a daycare service for them. Good doggy daycare services cost around $50 a day to take care of your pet. That’s a great price for daycare; it just depends if you can afford it.

 

Vet checkups and annual jabs

There’s also vet checkups and annual jabs to take into account. Most vet checkups cost around $45 a visit, that’s before any treatment has been prescribed. Treatment tends to come at an additional cost.

There’s also the cost of your pet’s annual jabs and boosters. The initial set will probably cost between $50 and $95, with annual boosters costing a little less than this. These are essential for your dog’s health, so it’s crucial that you’re able to afford to get them. Else, your dog could become seriously unwell.

Adding a dog to your family can be the most amazing thing to do, if you can afford it, that is. A dog’s for life, so you need to make sure that before you adopt a new pup into your family that you can afford to look after them.

 

Meat, meat and more meat may seem what your dog most loves to eat. But he needs more than just meat for a healthy, balanced diet. While dogs are carnivores, they require a full range of nutrients for proper growth, cell maintenance and optimum health.

More on Carnivores

Dogs are members of the Carnivora family, which is a large group of mammals with similar teeth structures. The group is broken down into several different categories:

  • True carnivores: Absolute requirement for meat, like cats
  • Herbivores: Plant matter can meet nutritional needs, like cows
  • Omnivores: Combination of plant matter and meat to meet nutritional needs, like humans and dogs

Dogs fall into the omnivore category, with both an intestinal tract and tooth structure adapted to a diet that contains a combination of meat and plant matter. The dog’s ideal diet contains high-quality components that:

  • Dogs can easily digest
  • Meet their full range of nutritional requirements

Dog Nutritional Requirements

Dogs require the full range of basic nutrients, and there are a total of six of them at your service. They are:

  • Proteins
  • Fats
  • Carbohydrates
  • Vitamins
  • Minerals
  • Water

The Association of American Feed Control Officials (AAFCO) developed national guidelines that serve as the general foundation for commercial pet foods for nutrient contents. Ensuring the food you choose

Proteins

Made up of amino acids, proteins are the foundation for cell maintenance, growth and repair. Dogs particularly need protein to maintain a shiny, healthy coat. Dogs’ bodies are able to produce 10 of the 20 amino acids needed for adequate nutrition, but the other 10 must come from their diet. The group is known as essential amino acids, and they are:

  • Arginine
  • Histidine
  • Isoleucine
  • Leucine
  • Lysine
  • Methionine
  • Phenylalanine
  • Threonine
  • Tryptophan
  • Valine

Fats

Fats provide highly concentrated energy, and they’re also crucial for cell maintenance and the creation of other bodily substances. They additionally help the dog’s body absorb fat-soluble vitamins while sprucing up the taste of the food. Your dog’s diet should include the three essential fatty acids:

  • Linoleic acid, source of omega-6
  • Linolenic acid, source of omega-3
  • Arachidonic acid

Carbohydrates

Carbohydrates are actually optional for dogs, as canines can get adequate supplies of energy from fats and protein. Carbs the dog’s body can digest can provide additional energy, while whole grain carbs can supply fiber, minerals, iron and other nutrients.

Two caveats with carbs are their digestibility and high calorie count:

  • Carbs must be cooked for the dog’s body to properly digest them; they can otherwise ferment in the dog’s large intestine.
  • Carbs are often the biggest source of calories in commercial dog foods; overfeeding can lead to excessive weight gain.

Vitamins and Minerals

Vitamins and minerals are only needed in small amounts for dogs, but both serve essential functions. Vitamins are organic substances that help convert calories into energy and ensure a body’s normal functioning. Minerals are inorganic substances that help with a wide scope of functions, such as the development of strong teeth and bones.

Choosing a Dog Food

The overall suggestion from one vet is to opt for the highest-quality dog food you can afford. The main differences between a low-cost and high-end food aren’t the levels of nutrients, but the source and quality of the ingredients.

High-end foods may list specific types of animal proteins or meat meal, such as chicken meal or lamb meal. Avoid foods that simply list “meat meal” generically. Generic “animal fats” are another ingredient to avoid, instead opting for fat derived from a specifically named source.

Additional ingredients to look for include:

  • Whole grains and fruit rather than flour, bran, gluten or refined grain products
  • Antioxidants, such as rosemary extract
  • Natural preservatives, such as vitamins C and E

Additional ingredients to avoid include:

  • Additional sweeteners, often listed as “grain fragments”
  • Artificial preservatives, colors or flavors
  • Any type of “by-product” from any source

Your dog’s daily diet plays a huge role in achieving and maintaining overall optimum health. Combine a healthy diet with plenty of exercise, training activities, routine medical visits and a pet insurance plan for those who need help covering the rising cost of vet bills.

Parting thoughts: If you find yourself forgetting the ins and outs of canine nutrition, bookmark this page and reread it until it clicks. If that doesn’t do the trick remember that a warm welcoming home with your loving presence is all that really matters to your furry BFF.

And that is the recipe for good doggy health — mind, body and soul.

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Dr. Pippa Elliott BVMS, MRCVS, is a veterinarian with over two decades of experience treating cats and dogs. She is also a research contributor to https://www.petinsuranceu.com. When she’s not working, she’s relaxing at home in London with a house full of her own beloved pets.

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According to the Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, around 45% of all dogs in the United States are overweight. Overweight dogs are more likely to suffer from the following:

  • Arthritis
  • Weakened immune system
  • Cancer
  • Heart Disease
  • Diabetes
  • Breathing Problems
  • High Blood Pressure

The following tips will help you learn how to help your dog lose weight.

 

  1. Feed Your Dog Correctly

You should feed your dog a small portion of food two to four times a day. It is important to measure the food as well. Use an 8 ounce measuring cup when you feed your pet. It’s too easy to accidentally give your dog too much food when you use a coffee cup or a scoop.

  1. Choose the Correct Type of Food

If you’d like your dog to lose weight, you will want to choose quality dog foods that contain above-average amounts of protein and below-average amounts of fat. Make sure you choose ones that have been approved by food and drug administration, and be mindful of harsh chemical and preservatives from the package. You may also mix high-quality dog food from the store with low-calorie dog food you make at home. Homemade dog food for weight loss is easy to prepare and store.

  1. Choose the Correct Types of Treats

Healthy dog treats will reward your pet for good behavior and keep him or her healthy at the same time. Choose organic dog treat that do not contain sugar. Sweet potato, salmon bites, or kangaroo treats for dogs are great alternatives to healthy snacks. Another tip is to break larger store-bought treats in half to lower the calorie count.

  1. Offer Chews

Bones and chews support a dog’s need to chew without adding extra calories. However, avoid chews such as pig ears since they can be high in fat content. Chews can also help keep the most avid food-beggar too busy to worry about eating extra food.

  1. Up Your Dog’s Exercise Level

Exercise is a great way to help your dog if you’re asking yourself how to get your dog to lose weight. Commit to taking your dog on a daily walk no matter the weather. Exercise will help your beloved pet lose weight and live longer.

 

How Much Exercise Does My Dog Need?

As little as 20 to 30 minutes of brisk walking or playing is all it takes to aid your dog’s weight loss. However; if your dog has been sedentary for a long period of time, you may want to ease into a higher activity level to avoid injury.

 

  1. Use Supplements

Check with your veterinarian to see if an omega-3 supplement can help your dog lose weight. Additionally, use of an L-carnitine supplement has been shown to increase lean muscle mass and aid in weight loss.

 

  1. Monitor Your Dog’s Progress

Weigh your dog every one to two weeks while you are engaging in a weight-loss program. This will help you determine if calories need to be further restricted. If your dog has lost too much weight, you will know that you can increase calorie intake.

 

Helping your dog lose weight is very possible if you stick with a proper diet and exercise regimen. Contact your veterinarian to determine the healthiest way for your dog to lose weight.

 

Alicia Hill

Alicia is a full-time freelancer. She writes for several companies and sites, including Zoe’s Doggy Treats. Alicia is very simple, plain, and chill most of the time. She enjoys being outdoors and spending time with loved ones.

Many people made a New Year’s resolution to lose weight. Did you? Did your dog make one also?

Obesity in humans has become a major health problem in the United States. The Center for Disease Control has estimated that 68% of the population is overweight and 33% are considered obese. Due to the propensity of people to treat their dogs as “their children” or in other terms as humans, this health problem is also emerging as a major problem for dogs. It has been reported that over 50% of dogs that live in the United States are overweight or obese. This is a staggering 44 million dogs.

dogonscale

This over-weight situation in our canine pets is creating the same health problems, as many modern-day humans are experiencing. These nutritional diseases and health problems are numerous including degenerative joint disease, high blood sugar levels, hypertension, hardening of the arteries, cardiovascular disease, kidney disease, breathing difficulties and pulmonary disease, torn knee tendons, cancer, and early mortality rates.

There are many economic, social, and psychological reasons why a sizeable percentage of the American population has reached this state of unhealthiness. In his most recent book, “The Well-Tuned Brain” Peter Whybrow uses extensive research from neuroscience, economics, philosophy, history, and anthropology to explain human behavior from the 2008 financial crisis to obesity. From his broad knowledge of neuroscience he describes how the intuitive or reflexive parts of the brain control much of our actions instinctively. The central theses of the book are concerned with our ability individually and as a society to survive in today’s tempting commercial consumer driven market culture when our brain often functioning on primeval instincts tells us to do the wrong things as assuming too much debt or eating too much.

With dogs even more of their actions are controlled by instinct. They cannot imagine, will think in the future, or think in the abstract. This is one reason why anthropomorphizing them, meaning we think about them as if they were human, can create problems especially when it comes to eating habits, diet, and obesity.

People have the ability to think about and plan for the future. Eat a light lunch because later you will sit down to a big dinner, your mother counsels you to quit eating snacks or you will not have room for dinner, I have to keep my New Year’s resolution to lose weight…. Etc. Dogs although very intelligent and demonstrate many personality, mental, and human type emotions cannot imagine or think about the future, they do not have the mental capacity, they react to the present. Their instincts inherited from the wolf tell them that when they find food as with a kill of deer they need to eat as much as possible as quickly as possible before bigger predators arrive and there might not be another kill for a long time. When they start to cross the road and a car is coming they many times with disastrous outcomes from instinct just try to run faster because they cannot anticipate that if they just wait the cars will pass and they can cross safely.

As stated it is a well-known and recognized common health problem in our domesticated dogs. It is documented and discussed in academic veterinarian literature, the commercial pet industry, and on the numerous Internet sites associated with our pets and dogs. The Association for Pet Obesity Prevention (APOP) is dedicated to educating dog owners about obesity in their pets. Its site http://www.petobesityprevention.org has comprehensive information on symptoms, causes, diagnosis, and treatment of this critical dog health problem. Much of the information in this article was obtained at this very informative site.

“Fat Pet Gap” is one very interesting concept that APOP identifies, in which 95% of owners of overweight and even obese dogs incorrectly believe their pet is normal weight. This obviously makes confronting the obesity problem difficult. APOP has calculators to compare overweight conditions in dogs to that of humans that help the dog owner to identify and start to work on alleviating the problem. For instance, it shows that a 12-pound Yorkie is the same as an average female weighing 218 pounds.

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The root cause of this problem for dog health is the same as in humans, eating too much, eating the wrong foods, and not enough exercise; calories consumed exceed calories expended. But this article is not meant to lecture dog owners on all the nitty-gritty details of dog obesity, but to try to make them think about problem from a different view; a view from the neuroscience of the dog’s brain.

Bruce Harte is a Partner and Head of the Research Staff at VitaHound.com . He has always been a devoted dog owner with his companions over the last 60+ years ranging from mongrels, to beagles to golden and black labs. They have always been raised naturally not only with diet and dog supplements but also with their environment including their adobe home in the high Sonoran Desert or rustic cabins high in the Pines of the White Mountains of eastern Arizona. Receiving his Bachelor of Science degree in 1968 Bruce has over 50 years experience in technical and scientific research. Bruce’s love of gardening, natural herbs and remedies combined with extensive knowledge of Native American culture has enabled the VitaHound site to become a robust source of dog supplement and nutrition information.

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by Sally Gutteridge

Is your dog always telling you how hungry he is? Perhaps you can’t seem to fill him up or maybe you feel guilty that he won’t eat his own food but often looks like he is starving whilst you eat yours?

Hunger in dogs can be due to a number of things and sometimes the big eyed, pleading animal is not actually hungry at all, but how can you tell the difference?

Does the Dog Food Satisfy?

The first thing to do, if your dog still seems hungry, is take a look at your dog’s food packaging. What does his dinner actually contain? Is it fulfilling all of your dog’s nutritional needs or does it leave him lacking? It is absolutely reasonable that if your dog eats poor quality food he could eat the entire bowl and still be hungry afterwards because his body needs specific vitamins which poor quality food does not fully supply.

Whilst researching and writing the complete natural health guide for Shih Tzu Web I found a few great online resources that enable you to locate the best dog food for your budget and your dog’s appetite. The basic rule with dog food, at the moment, is that anything goes.

Much commercial dog food is made ingredients deemed unfit for human consumption and vitamin content is of such low quality that they may not help control your dog’s hunger at all.

The lesson is that if your dog ignores his own food, yet will eat anything else that’s going, it may be because his food is no good for him. So check out that bag, tin or foil of dog food first.

How is Your Dog’s General Condition?

Your dog’s general condition will tell you how well his food is meeting his nutritional needs. The first few signs of nutrient deficiency are pretty obvious yet by the time they appear the dog’s immune system is already affected.

If your dog is eating all of his food yet still seems hungry and has the following symptoms then it is time to look at whether his food is doing its job;

  • Low quality coat
  • Dandruff
  • Depression
  • Hunger despite being at full weight or even overweight
  • Wind
  • Poor quality stools
  • Repeated episodes of parasites, particularly fleas

All of the above symptoms can be obvious signs of poor quality food and allergen ingestion. When a food is poor quality the dog can become overweight yet easily still be hungry because the body is screaming out for nutrients. This is a problem in the human species too and exactly why fast food diets lead to obesity in many people.

So first of all if your dog is hungry check out the ingredients of his food. You can also take a look at Dog Food Project for further information.

What If His Food Is Top Quality?

If you spend a fortune on dog food, try the very best to keep your dog’s appetite satiated yet he still seems hungry what on earth can you do?

First of all be sure that your dog does not have worms or other parasites which may be stealing his nutrients. Many veterinarians have one off worm treatment that are pretty un-invasive and by treating your dog you can be sure that he is not still hungry.

If you have everything covered with food and parasite treatments and your dog still seems hungry you may simply be reinforcing a begging habit. When a dog begs from the table or your plate and you hand over some food you are on a slippery slope to fussy eating.

If you suspect that your dog’s eyes are hungrier than his stomach you only need to look at his general condition to confirm this. The canine with a shiny coat, healthy weight and sprightly stride probably just begs out of habit.

When the dog is in great physical condition his body betrays him and no matter how hungry he looks his food probably meets his nutritional needs perfectly well. This type of begging is related more to behavior than health and the dog that does it, is probably not even hungry at all.

 

Bio:

Sally-Gutteridge

Sally Gutteridge is a member of the International Society of Animal Professionals. She is a qualified British Military dog trainer and trainer of Hearing Dogs for Deaf People. She is soon to be fully qualified Canine Behavior Manager. With the rehabilitation experience of many broken rescue dogs and the careful training of many Shih Tzu dogs, Sally has written the definitive course on improving your dog’s behavior and your understanding of it. She shares her knowledge at Shih Tzu Web.

Staying fit and healthy while successfully handling your busy work agenda is becoming increasingly difficult nowadays. If you’re like me, you’ll probably crash out on the sofa after you get home from work and take a dive for crisps, takeout pizza and other fatty grubs that always stick to the most unfortunate parts of the anatomy. The same goes for dogs – without regular workout, your pet can quickly gain too much weight and fall out of shape. Workout is the best to remedy figure problems – and from my experience with my two dogs, Astoria and Brando, our weight loss exercise helped us both bond better and work on a common goal together. Here, I have several useful tips for pet owners looking to spend quality time with their dogs and lose an extra pound at the same time.Bond with your dog while you both get fit

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  1. Keep walking

One of the easiest ways to get the vital workout with your dog, regular walks around the neighborhood and its vicinity can do wonders for your pet’s figure – and your BMI and waist circumference too. For best results and health benefits, walk your dog at a brisk pace and make sure your canine friend keeps up your pace by a fast trot.

  1. Training with reward

For an extra dash of training motivation and optimal workout efficiency, don’t feed your pet until you’ve returned from your regular exercise routine. In case your pet is reluctant to go out, bring along some canine snacks to keep up its enthusiasm. I had this problem with Astoria for a while but I eventually managed to cajole her into exercising with me and Brando regularly after I bought some dog food online and took kibbles of it on our walks to feed her on the go. Snacks and chews helped me keep her going for an extra mile by rewarding her once in a while.

 

  1. Mix activities

To maximize workout effects and bond with your canine partner better, you can mix different activities in your exercise routine. For instance, a game of chase or a quick dash with your pet running by your side will help you lose weight and get back into shape faster than just regular walks. Begin the running routine by short sprint intervals (reward your pet after the run with a healthy treat if necessary) and work toward a steady fast trot for several weeks.

  1. Ball time

Bringing some toys on for the workout will help you burn a dozen extra calories, so if you want to diversify your training regimen, don’t forget to pack a tennis ball and/or Frisbee. Just like humans, dogs can get bored on the walk and may refuse to keep up the training even with tasty rewards. That’s where a Frisbee or small ball may come in useful – the game of chase or fetch is always exciting, and it may help you persuade the pet to keep moving, though perhaps not necessarily in the direction of your walk destination.

  1. Diet together

If you and your pet both need to lose weight, starting a diet together would be a smart idea. Seeing your dog slim by eating less (or healthier) food will be a great motivation for you to stay on the same track and not give in to starchy food temptations

 

 

Roxana is an adventurer, a frequent traveler and blogger at highstylife.com. Besides traveling she loves to cook exotic food and take care of her two adorable dogs Astoria and Brando and her mischievous cat Archibald. Roxana is a freelance Sydney tour guide and an environmentalist by vocation, and she loves taking long walks at the beach.

We all love our dogs and we love giving them treats when they do something good. But we may not know what’s in those store bought treats and if it is good or bad. It doesn’t help when there are recalls for dog foods and treats as well, that end up worrying dog owners more than anything. So when you want to give your dog a special treat, what do you do? Well, here are two do-it-yourself gourmet dog treat recipes that you can easily make at home:

Natural Greenies Treats
Greenies is a brand of dental dog treats that helps to freshen breath and clean teeth. Here is your recipe for natural Greenies treats at home! You’ll need: 3 ½ c organic brown rice flour, 1 tbsp premium activated charcoal, 4 tbsp vegetable oil, 1 egg, ½ c packed fresh mint, ½ c packed fresh italian parsley, 1 c chicken broth, 1 tsp Swanson GreenFoods Liquid Chlorophyll.

Heat your oven to 400 and then line a baking sheet with either parchment or spray with non-stick spray. Then mix the flour and the charcoal and put to the side. Now, you’ll want to finely chop the mint and parsley and mix it with both the oil and ¼ c of the broth so that it makes a paste. Once you have your paste made, add in the chlorophyll and mix well. Carefully add the paste mix to the flour and knead like a bread recipe. You’ll want to add in the remaining broth carefully, mixing well in between each addition. If you find that the recipe is getting too stick to knead or roll out, you can add in a bit more flour or dust the area that you’re working with it. The dough will not be green, in fact, it will be a dark gray color normally. Once you have your dough completely mixed and kneaded, roll it out and use a cookie cutter to make fun shapes. Bake at 400 degrees for about 15-20 minutes. Let them cool and then store in an air tight container in the fridge.

Dog Chicken Jerky
Every dog loves meat, so why not make them and organic treat that they can gobble up? Here is a recipe for organic chicken jerky for your furry baby. Here’s what you’ll need: 1 package lg organic boneless chicken breasts, and a pinch of sea salt. (Pretty simple, right?!) Preheat your oven to 200 degrees and cut the chicken into very thing strips, cutting with the grain and removing all fat. Very lightly sprinkle sea salt onto the strips, not too much, just enough that your dog thinks they are getting human food. Now, lay the strips on a baking sheet or rack and bake about 2 hours at 200 degrees or until the meat is dry, but still soft (like jerky). If you’re not sure that it’s totally done yet, you can leave it in for another 20 minutes or so, checking it often. You basically want to make sure that they chicken is done all the way through.

When it’s finished, let it cool and then store it in an air tight container in the fridge. You can also use a dehydrator for this if you have one, but the oven version does make the chicken a little softer for your dog to chew. And hey, why not try some for yourself while you’re at it? Although, your dog may get a bit jealous.

Thanksgiving is nearly here once again and for most of us that means wonderful aromas wafting through the house and a table groaning under the weight of turkey and other favorite dishes. There will be family and friends gathered ’round and perhaps a slice of pumpkin pie. But, what about your dog? What does Thanksgiving mean for him?

 

Well, if you’re lucky, it won’t mean a trip to the vet because you’ve overfed him or given him some sharp bones to eat! Most of us want to share Thanksgiving with our dogs but, the truth is, Thanksgiving can be a dangerous time for pets. Rich foods can cause gastrointestinal upsets or even pancreatitis. Giving your dog a cooked turkey bone can lead to a punctured esophagus or other puncture in your dog’s stomach or G.I. Tract, so no cooked bones! Here are some other tips for you and your dog this Thanksgiving.

 

  • According to one poll, 56 percent of pet owners said they gave their pets Thanksgiving leftovers but you need to be careful about what you share with your dog. For instance, turkey is great. It’s an excellent protein that is nice and lean – as long as you remove the skin. And be sure to avoid giving your dog any cooked bones. Cooked bones are brittle so they can easily snap and form jagged edges that are harmful to dogs.

 

  • Say no to onion and garlic. Many Thanksgiving dishes contain onion, garlic, leeks, and scallions. If your dog eats these ingredients in any large amount, it can be harmful to him. These items are all members of the allium family and they have been linked to a form of anemia in dogs. Sure, you may occasionally give your dog something that contains garlic and it doesn’t hurt him, but don’t give your dog any foods that contain much of these ingredients.

 

  • Yes to veggies. It’s fine to give your dog some leftovers of green beans, cranberries, or even macaroni and cheese (if he can eat cheese). Mashed potatoes are good, too. Dogs enjoy many vegetable dishes. However, watch out for the “extras” and fancy fixin’s – those things added to a dish to make it special. For instance, if you add garlic or sour cream to your mashed potatoes, it could make it off limits for your dog. If you use cranberry sauce that has a lot of sugar added, it won’t be so good for your dog. If you would like to give your dog some veggies, try setting aside a bowl for your dog before you add the extras to it.

 

  • Avoid fat. Just avoid giving your dog extra fat, in general. While we like to see good named fat sources in dog food, it’s not a good idea to feed your dog leftovers that contain generous amounts of fat at Thanksgiving. Most dogs aren’t used to eating so much fat all at one time. The result can be an attack of acute pancreatitis. Vets report that the days following Thanksgiving are some of their busiest of the year for pancreatitis in dogs.

 

  • Be careful with other foods. There are some foods you should never give to dogs such as chocolate, macadamia nuts, grapes, raisins, pits from cherries and other pitted foods, and the artificial sweetener xylitol.

 

  • As for the pumpkin pie? Well, canned pumpkin, minus the spiced pie filling would be better for your dog. And dogs really don’t need whipped cream.

 

  • And one more time: No Cooked Bones! It’s fine if you would like to give your dog a raw bone such as a turkey neck. Raw bones are comparatively soft and easy for your dog to chew and digest. They won’t break off into jagged pieces when he chews them.

 

You can see there are many delicious things you can share with your dog at Thanksgiving. Just give some thought and care to what you give your dog and you won’t end up taking him to see the vet.

Thanksgiving is nearly here once again and for most of us that means wonderful aromas wafting through the house and a table groaning under the weight of turkey and other favorite dishes. There will be family and friends gathered ’round and perhaps a slice of pumpkin pie. But, what about your dog? What does Thanksgiving mean for him?

Well, if you’re lucky, it won’t mean a trip to the vet because you’ve overfed him or given him some sharp bones to eat! Most of us want to share Thanksgiving with our dogs but, the truth is, Thanksgiving can be a dangerous time for pets. Rich foods can cause gastrointestinal upsets or even pancreatitis. Giving your dog a cooked turkey bone can lead to a punctured esophagus or other puncture in your dog’s stomach or G.I. Tract, so no cooked bones! Here are some other tips for you and your dog this Thanksgiving.

  • According to one poll, 56 percent of pet owners said they gave their pets Thanksgiving leftovers but you need to be careful about what you share with your dog. For instance, turkey is great. It’s an excellent protein that is nice and lean – as long as you remove the skin. And be sure to avoid giving your dog any cooked bones. Cooked bones are brittle so they can easily snap and form jagged edges that are harmful to dogs.
  • Say no to onion and garlic. Many Thanksgiving dishes contain onion, garlic, leeks, and scallions. If your dog eats these ingredients in any large amount, it can be harmful to him. These items are all members of the allium family and they have been linked to a form of anemia in dogs. Sure, you may occasionally give your dog something that contains garlic and it doesn’t hurt him, but don’t give your dog any foods that contain much of these ingredients.
  • Yes to veggies. It’s fine to give your dog some leftovers of green beans, cranberries, or even macaroni and cheese (if he can eat cheese). Mashed potatoes are good, too. Dogs enjoy many vegetable dishes. However, watch out for the “extras” and fancy fixin’s – those things added to a dish to make it special. For instance, if you add garlic or sour cream to your mashed potatoes, it could make it off limits for your dog. If you use cranberry sauce that has a lot of sugar added, it won’t be so good for your dog. If you would like to give your dog some veggies, try setting aside a bowl for your dog before you add the extras to it.
  • Avoid fat. Just avoid giving your dog extra fat, in general. While we like to see good named fat sources in dog food, it’s not a good idea to feed your dog leftovers that contain generous amounts of fat at Thanksgiving. Most dogs aren’t used to eating so much fat all at one time. The result can be an attack of acute pancreatitis. Vets report that the days following Thanksgiving are some of their busiest of the year for pancreatitis in dogs.
  • Be careful with other foods. There are some foods you should never give to dogs such as chocolate, macadamia nuts, grapes, raisins, pits from cherries and other pitted foods, and the artificial sweetener xylitol.
  • As for the pumpkin pie? Well, canned pumpkin, minus the spiced pie filling would be better for your dog. And dogs really don’t need whipped cream.
  • And one more time: No Cooked Bones! It’s fine if you would like to give your dog a raw bone such as a turkey neck. Raw bones are comparatively soft and easy for your dog to chew and digest. They won’t break off into jagged pieces when he chews them.

 

You can see there are many delicious things you can share with your dog at Thanksgiving. Just give some thought and care to what you give your dog and you won’t end up taking him to see the vet.