Archive for Dog Safety

A man’s best friend deserves more than just the four corners of the backyard. Your pup most likely wants to explore the four corners of the world! The ambition is there, but let’s just start with a nice road trip. Instinctually, most people will just have their dog hop into the car and go, but there really is much more to it than that. Taking care of your dog and your health are of the utmost importance here. Trust me, if the dog starts getting upset, you will regret it. Not to mention the distractions that are unnecessary while you are driving. Here are some great tips to ensure you have a safe, healthy, and fun road trip with your pup.

Reach out to your vet

You will want to reach out to your vet, especially if you are going for a long trip. Most illnesses can be unseen to the average dog owner. Reaching out will ease your mind and keep your beloved dog safe while driving. Another good reason to check up with the vet is to see what he might say in terms of health concerns when traveling. He could be your best line of defense to preventing illness, ticks, or other problems that can occur.

Acquire a dog crate will prove to be useful

A dog crate will prove to be useful in stressful situations. Nobody likes putting their little pal into that jam-packed space, but it will greatly increase safety. For example, driving through a stressful city can be daunting on its own. The odds of an accident will greatly increase if your dog is free-roaming the car while you navigate. Therefore, one should pull over before the city and get the dog in the safe crate. This will help you immensely and you can just let your dog out when you are done.

Get the weather report before you drive

Nothing is worse than driving with your dog and having to embrace a bad storm. This could really cause your dog to freak out. Which means you will have to keep it in the crate for hours on end. Before you head on your road trip, watch the weather channel or check google to see the weather report for the days that follow. Hopefully, it will be all sunshine and clear skies.

Have enough space in your vehicle

If you do not have a good-sized vehicle, it is going to feel like you and your dog are both in a crate. This will put a serious damper on your road trip. The highest recommended type of vehicle for space and luxury is a Crossover SUV. This is the perfect compromise between style and space that every dog lover admires. This will allow your dog to roam free without either one of you feeling cramped. Not to mention how great it is to have space for the dog crate and your luggage.

Last minute bathroom plan

You never know when the bowels are going to start moving. This could be difficult if you are driving 70 miles an hour down the highway. Make sure you have your doggy bags to pick up after your dog and a good plan to dispose of it when you need to. This is respectful to others and something that is, unfortunately, easily forgotten by some dog owners. Hopefully, you can train your dog to notify you when the time is near to pull over.

Update the ID tag

This is very important. You never know what can happen out on the road. One minute you could be taking your dog for a walk, then the next minute your dog is gone chasing after a rabbit. Therefore, you want to update the ID tag. That way, if someone finds your pup, they can easily call you. If your dog doesn’t have an ID tag and animal control comes across them, they will consider it a stray and put the dog in the pound. That is never a good situation, especially on a road trip.

Another great option is to consider getting a GPS tracker for your pup. This will help keep your anxiety attack under control if the worst-case scenario happens.

Plan your Trip

Planning the trip is always a good idea. Try to find good spots along your route to walk your dog. You can even seek out a dog park, so your dog can make some friends. This will be good because you and your dog will get some exercise as opposed to sitting in the same spot for hours. Keep that blood moving to stay healthy.

Make sure to find the cautious areas too. Knowing where not to go could keep you and your buddy out of danger.

Now it is time to hit the road! You will have a safer and healthier trip with your dog. It will definitely be a fun and unforgettable experience now that you are prepared. Have a safe drive!

Excess food, cold temperatures outside, and central heating inside call all lead to problems with our health, and it’s no different for our canine friends either. That is why you need to know how to keep your pooch as a healthy as possible during the colder months. Luckily, below you will find some winter wonder tips to help you do just that, so read on to find out more.

 

No outside living

 

Keeping your dogs outside can be something of a controversial topic as dogster.com states, but in the winter it can be a real issue of contention. After all, dogs will feel the cold, even if they have thick coats and keeping them outside where the temperature can drop below zero really is not on.

 

That means it’s vital that you bring your pooches inside for the winter season. To do this, it can be useful to create a bedding area for them in a section of the house that is a little quieter. A place like the utility room can work well, as then they will be at relaxed and home even if they aren’t used to being around people all the time.

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You will also need to provide some warm and conformable winter bedding to keep them at the right temperature, as well as freshwater too. If you don’t want them roaming the rest of the house all the time you can use a baby gate in the doorway so they can still see what everyone is doing and yet be limited to their special space.

 

Use vitamins and supplements to keep them healthy

 

Next, it’s a good idea to up your dog’s vitamins and supplements to keep them healthy during the colder weather, just like you do with the rest of the family. Luckily, you can go to sites like topdogvitamins.com now and get the lowdown on which types of supplements are best for you dog. There you can find advice about what more senior dogs need, as well as some info on the advantage of probiotics and fish oil supplements. The latter being something that can really help with itchy skin that is often the result of going from the warm indoors to the cold outdoors and back again, during the winter months.

 

Avoid Christmas tidbits

 

Anyone that has seen their dogs long, sad face when their owner is eating a delicious Christmas treat will know how hard it is to resists giving them just a bite. However, it can actually be in their interest to not give them a tidbit, even if they are desperately begging for it.

Even if they make this face, don’t feed them Christmas human treats. Picture source

 

This is because many items of human food are delicious to dogs but can cause them serious health problems. Unfortunately, these types of food seem to be around in abundance over the Christmas period, making it harder to keep them away from Fido.

 

To help you stand firm in this, it can help to know what awful reaction common Holiday foods can cause in your pet. Chocolate, for example, is toxic to dogs and can cause vomiting and diarrhea. While cheese, another Christmas favorite is known to contain high levels of lactose, something that many canines cannot stomach. Nuts also popular during the holidays can also be dangerous, with some dogs having allergies similar to humans, so are best avoided. Find out more about this at mom.me. Although there are some items such as cooked and deboned turkey with a little gravy that they can eat in small amounts.

 

It can also be helpful to remember to get your pup some specially made dog treats for the Christmas period. Then when they are after what you are snacking on you can give them one of those instead of caving in and feeding them something you know they shouldn’t have.

 

Extra precautions when walking

Taking extra precautions while walking your dog in the winter. Picture source

 

Even though it’s cold outside Fido still needs to be walked twice a day, and that means taking some extra precautions when you do take them outside. In particular, be careful about the weather when you take them out. Try and walk them when it’s sunny so the ice and frost is melted from the paths and it doesn’t hurt their pads. Although dog shoes can also help create a protective barrier for this issue.

 

Also, watch out for deep snow, although your dog will probably love it, it can be dangerous as it covers things over and you have no idea what hazards lay underneath. Be very careful of exposing your dog to long walks in very low temperatures as well, as they are just as susceptible to frostbite as us humans are. That means keep outings short and sweet if the thermometer reads low and educate yourself in the subtle sign of frostbite, just in case the worse does happen.

 

Increase meals

 

Something that can help your pup cope with the colder temperature in the winter is as petmd.com suggests to increase their food allowance. This is because dogs gain their energy to move about and stay warm from their food, and by giving them more you make it easier for them to keep their body at a constant temperature, no matter what the weather outside.

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Of course, it is a delicate balance between increasing what they have on a normal day and overfeeding. That means it is a good idea to check the packets of dog food for advice on portions or even ask your vet if you have a dog with a medical issue that could be affected by increasing their meals.

 

It’s also a good idea to offer your dog more meals through the day rather than just making their two normal feeding times bigger. This is because it can help them to digest their food better and ensure their energy levels stay constantly topped up. Something that will make it easier for them to keep warm no matter what time of day it is.

 

Doggy clothes

 

Lastly, whatever your feelings on doggy fashions, providing a jumper or jacket for your pooch, as barkpost.com suggests can make a massive difference in keeping them warm. Something especially relevant if they are a short-haired breed.

 

There are even dog goggles on the market now that you can buy too, that act as sunglasses. Something that can be very useful if you are taking them out in the snow to prevent the glare getting in their eyes.

 

Pixabay

 

Gardens are lovely places for your dog to play and relax in. Having said that, it’s also the perfect place to wreak havoc too, like digging up your strawberry plants!

Some gardens can also be dangerous to dogs because of the plants that are growing, due to harmful chemicals or sharp edges.

There are plenty things you can do to make sure your dog can have a safe sanctuary in your backyard. Here’s a few to get you started.

Make the garden exciting

Make different routes around and through your garden so your pup can have an adventure. If you have the space, create some digging spots too to give your dog a bit of stimulation. The more textures you offer your pup, the more fun it will be because it’s giving them all sorts of different experiences into one.

Dogs wee on lawns

A dogs wee can turn your beautiful green grass into horrible patches of yellow. Try and train your dog not to pee on the lawn, but if there’s nowhere else for them to go in the garden, hose the area down straight after. If that option still doesn’t work for you, think about investing in some pet zen garden grass. This is soft and fluffy just like real grass, but it’s synthetic instead, meaning your dog can pee, and nothing will get ruined. And when they do their business, just clean it up with a doggy bag like you usually would.

Plant robust plants

Playful pups can damage your delicate flowers, so if you don’t want this to happen, either create a fence around them or just take them out and replace them with something a lot more robust, than won’t die if it gets knocked around a little. Lavender is a great option and leaves your garden smelling divine.

Keep dogs away from slugs and snails

Be very wary when it’s damp outside, that your dog doesn’t come into contact with any slugs or snails. If your pup ingests these, they may get lungworm which isn’t pleasant. Symptoms include lethargy, difficulty in breathing, and coughing. If you notice any of these, take them to the vets.

Avoid toxic plants

There are many plants out there that are extremely harmful to your furry friends. Buttercups, daffodils, foxglove, oaks, tomatoes, and yew are just a few examples of what to avoid.

If you notice a change in your dog and think they may have eaten something they shouldn’t have, take them straight to the vets just to be on the safe side.

Secure your compost bin

If you have a compost bin in your garden, your dog may be very interested in it, especially if it contains scraps of old food giving off all sorts of different odours. These may be harmful to your pup though, so make sure they can’t break into it.

Keep your shed secure

If you have a shed in your garden, make sure it’s locked up and your dog has no way of getting in. You don’t want them having access to any sharp tools, electrical equipment, or harmful chemicals.

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Pets can make travel very hard. When you’ve got an animal which relies on your care, you have to be careful to make sure they’re looked after while you’re gone. Usually, with dogs, this will be handled by a kennel service, making it a bit easier. But, should you even be using a service like this to look after your dog? Will they be happy there? Questions like this make the whole decision very hard to make. So, to help you out, this post will be going through some of the benefits of taking them with you and leaving them at home. So, now, you just have to book the flights.

 

Leaving your dog in a kennel is a great way to take away the stress of having them overseas with you. They will be looked after by professionals who complete this role on a daily basis, so you know that they will be treated well. And, companies like this often have their own medical professionals, too. So, if your dog gets hurt or is ill, they’ll have the best possible treatment. Along with this, having your dog kept safely at home will have a big impact on the stress you feel while away. Just knowing that your dog is cared for can be enough to have a huge impact on how you feel. Of course, a lot of people will be worried about having their dog left with strangers, though. And, this sort of concern is a very valid one if your dog is very clingy.

 

If you don’t want your dog in a kennel, you have little choice but to take it with you on the trip. Most modern airlines are happy to accommodate dogs, as long as you make the right efforts to let them know you’ll be bringing your furry friend. Taking your dog with you enables you to keep a close eye on them. They won’t get lonely because they’ll be with you. And, they will get to experience some of the greatest times in their life. Like humans, dogs like to travel. Seeing new things and enjoying new scents is all very exciting for a canine. So, taking them on a trip like this could make them very happy. But, of course, you should consider how fair it is to have them on a plane for several hours. And, whether or not you will be able to look after them properly while away.

 

For those that decide to take their dog with them, there will be a lot of work to do before you get there. And, you’ll still have some to do while you’re away. There are loads of companies out there which offer dog travel accessories to make this whole thing easier. For example, taking a collapsable water bowl to a hot country is a good idea. Otherwise, your dog might not get enough to drink. Along with this, you should also make sure that your dog has all of the relevant vaccines and other medical precautions before you leave.

 

Hopefully, this post will give you a good idea of the trouble trying to travel with a dog can bring. Not a lot of people put this sort of thought into their travels. But, when you have a pet with you, you have to be extra careful.

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It’s easy to dog-proof your home. Most of us carry this out before even bringing a puppy back. A lot of it is common sense: don’t leave loose wires about, keep medication up and out of the way in a locked cupboard, don’t leave bars of chocolate in reach. But sadly, you can’t guarantee that everyone else will be so canine aware. When you leave your home with your dog, it is your responsibility to ensure their safety. Here are a few precautionary measures you might like to consider taking.

Picture Credit

 

Harnesses and Leads

Always keep your dog on a lead when you leave the house. Even if your pet is well trained and will walk at your heel, harnesses and leads are an essential. Firstly, you never know how someone else’s dog might behave. You may have to pull your dog away at any time. Secondly, your dog might see a squirrel or cat and take chase. Thirdly, something could spook your pooch, which could result in them bolting across the roads or out of sight.

Muzzles

If your dog is liable to snap, or may be entering a stressful or uncomfortable situation, then invest in a good quality muzzle. This isn’t only essential for other people’s or dogs’ safety. It’s for your dog’s wellbeing too. Basket style muzzles are great for active dogs, as they allow them to pant freely when exercising.

Seat belts

You wouldn’t drive your car without putting your seatbelt on. You also wouldn’t pull off without ensuring that any children on board are clipped in. So why should your dog be any different? Most people won’t even consider a dog seat belt, but if you take your pooch out in the car, they’re an absolute essential. Most varieties can simply fasten onto the back of your pet’s harness. They will keep your pet in one place and help towards protecting them if you happen to get into any accidents. Never leave your dog unattended in any vehicle.

Picture Credit

 

Supervision

Never leave your dog unattended in general. It’s as simple as that. You might think there’s no problem with leaving your dog tied to a post outside of the pub while you pop in for a pint. Or tying them up outside the corner shop while you go in for a few minutes to pick up essentials. But dog theft is at an all-time high. When in public, never take your eyes off your pet.

Look Out For Glass

We walk over sharp objects regularly every day. But we don’t notice at all. Why? Because when we leave the house, we protect ourselves by putting shoes on. Now, we aren’t suggesting that you force your pup to wear shoes. But you should keep a lookout for any broken glass on the floor in areas where you are walking. Dogs have tough paws which can deal easily with all sorts of hard or rough terrain. But glass can cause wounds, which could need veterinary attention and cause them pain when they walk.

A dog is for many people a member of the family that is why car rides are not complete without them. We all know that dogs are not able to seat still in a car and that is why they need seats. Apart from the regular seat covers, does a dog need others specifically for them? When you go through the dog section at the local store, one of the many accessories you come across is a car seat cover. This is how helpful it is.

Cleanliness

Dogs are known to sit anywhere provided that it is comfortable for them. In most cases, these are not usually the cleanest places and you will often find dirt on the body of the animal. Since it is not possible to keep checking whether your dog is clean before they enter the car, a car seat cover protects the car seats and interiors from getting dirty. You need to keep your car clean on the inside to reduce the frequency of washing which in time may lead to premature wear and tear.

Dryness

Have you ever seen a dog with its tongue out? In most cases, this happens when it is hot and the mouth drools as a way of cooling the canine. The weather does change all the time and you will not know for sure when your dog’s body will need to cool down. If this happens when your dog is in the car however, having a car seat cover protects the seats from getting wet. Even if you are sure that the dog’s saliva is completely free of any disease, you will need the seats to be dry when you offer someone a lift.

Durable

Most dogs tend to be playful when they are in a moving vehicle. They get excited when the outside appears to be moving and this gets them jumping up and down in the car. Apart from this playfulness being dangerous to the dog because it could cause them to be hit when it slips, its paws will scratch the seat covers when the dog lands and tried to gain balance. Having car seat covers ensures that any damage caused by the dog to the car seats is happening on the removable covers and not on the car seats.

A dog car seat cover is a necessity for your car when you have a dog that rides with you. You will prevent many expenses you would have incurred if the car seats get damaged in one way or the other.

 

Bio:

Asaf Paran

Founder & CEO

Tripet Co.

 

“If you saw a dog going to be crushed under a car, wouldn’t you help him?

-Oskar Schindler

When you’re living in a country where the temperature goes down to minus degree, and you can’t tolerate the cold, how your canine companion behave? Did you try to notice that ever? Do it cuddle up in the bed under a cozy blanket? It also has a tough time in this frosty condition.

It’s high time to show a little extra care for your pet at home during winter. There are some tips below which can make it healthy, safe and happy in this cold weather.

Danger in the cold

Frostbite

The dog can suffer from frostbite. When it’s exposed to cold for a longer time, tissue might get damaged severely. At this moment, the dog pulls the blood from the extremities to the center automatically, and ears, paws or tail get cold. There’re various symptoms you can notice for it:

  • Discoloration of the skin like- grey or bluish.
  • Very cold to touch
  • Ulcers on the skin
  • Dead skin
  • Pain or swelling

Treatment:

You may not notice the sign of frostbite immediately as they develop after the exposure. Look for veterinary as soon as possible to avoid any complication and infection. Besides, as first aid, you can warm and rewarm with warm water of 104 -108 degree Celsius. Dry afterward and keep your pet warm.

Hypothermia

 

If you find your pet’s temperature getting down below the normal range, then you’ve to understand that your pet has caught Hypothermia. It’s a life-threatening condition if it goes untreated and unrecognized. The symptoms include:

  • Shivering
  • Low heart rate and respiratory rate
  • Collapse
  • Lethargy
  • Muscle stiffness

Treatment:

Consult with the veterinary care as soon as possible. On the other hand, as a first aid treatment, re-warm your pet with a warm blanket or hot water and dry it up.

Dangerous Chemicals

Antifreeze

It’s a deadly poison. Just a small amount of it can be fatal. It tastes sweet, and thus dogs try to lick it wherever they get. So try to clean all the spill.

 

Ice melters

Wash your pet’s feet off after coming from outside. Salts and ice melts are commonly known as the skin irritant. If your dog has long fur, clean the stomach area properly.

Indoor Bed With Cozy Bedding

During winter, make an arrangement for an indoor bed for your pet. When the temperature drops, don’t keep the pet outdoor.

Again, when your dogs are inside, don’t let them sleep on a cold floor. Make a cozy bedding. Provide warm blankets to create a comfy environment. Besides, make a raised bed so that they don’t come in contact with the tiles or cold floor.

To keep the bed warm avoid using heated pet mats. This is because there can be the risk of burns or fire. So it’s better not to go for heated pet mat.

Keep The Places Clean

As a dog owner you might have been aware of this issue that, there’re a lot of risks of getting your dog sick.
Again, there are several diseases that get transmitted from dog to human.

So, keep the places where your dog lives, eats, plays, sleeps and passes time clean of dog waste. It’s better to clean the dog wastes with a pooper scooper rather than using hands along.

Add A Little Bit More Food; But Not Overfeeding

From the study of Washington State University College of Veterinary Medicine,  you can offer 10-15% more food to your pet to provide extra calorie during winter. This is because the dog uses own energy when it gets cold. But excess food can even cause diarrhea or gastrointestinal trouble.

For extra food ensures that it adds coat not a layer of fat. A raw meat based diet can ensure a healthy coat and thus good energy for the cold winter

Paw care

During winter time, it’s better to use dog booties. Your dog can suffer from cracked pad. Again, the salt or ice can also burn the pads. Don’t allow your dog to lick it off after coming from outside rather rinse it or wipe it.

Proper grooming

Don’t shave the pet’s fur during winter rather keep it longer. Bath your dog with warm water and keep it dry after bathing. You can also switch to waterless shampoo if needed. Trim the nails with clippers and clean the dog’s pad properly.

Keep your dog hydrated

Dog dehydrate very quickly in summer and winter. So keep water bowl nearby your dog. It’ll eat snow to get out of dehydration. But don’t allow it to eat because it might cause stomach upset.

Proper training

  • Train your dog properly so that it can enjoy the winter weather condition
  • Have a loose leash for avoiding any accident in the slippery road
  • Recall it frequently so that the dog can avoid frozen body of water while coming towards you
  • Make the foot-wiping, a part of your daily routine. And reward your pet your allowing you to examine and clean the foot pad.

Take care of the senior dog

The cold weather worsens the health condition in dog mainly the one suffering from arthritis. Make its resting area soft and warm and be careful while walking on the slippery road. During winter, the dog gets ill easily like a human being.

Did you find the tips helpful for you? Share your opinion with us

Make Your Garage Pet Friendly

garage1

Photo by Tony Evans

By Chelsy Ranard

If most of us had our way we’d either spend all day at home with our pets or bring them to work with us. Unfortunately, there are times when our furry children must stay at home without us. Some people leave their pets inside, in a kennel, in the back yard, or in one room in their home. One great opportunity for your pet’s haven is the garage. It offers shelter and a larger area for them to roam. However, there are some things to consider before leaving your animal in the garage while you’re away.

Safety First

Before leaving your animal in the garage at all it is vitally important to take care of the safety concerns in your garage. Clean the floors and consider painting over the concrete to eliminate any oil or any other vehicle fluid from coming into contact with your animal. If your pet ingests any antifreeze it can be fatal. Remove any chemicals, any small objects they could ingest, and sharp objects they can injure themselves on. Make sure your garage has appropriate ventilation, if not you can add a ventilation system or a window that will also be useful in adding natural light.

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Photo by Gold Label Door

Temperature Control

Temperature control is very important for leaving your pet in the garage. For the summer months the garage does tend to stay cooler than most other areas inside or outdoors due to the concrete structure of most garages. However, it is smart to include a fan to ensure your pet will not overheat if the garage temperature gets uncomfortably high. Be sure to be mindful of the ways to keep your dog cool during the summer. Many can be modified for the garage, like going for a swim can be translated to putting a small kiddie pool in the garage with them. Similarly, in the winter months you’ll need to make sure your garage is heated or bring in a space heater. Just make sure the space heater isn’t accessible to your furry friend.

Doggy Doors

Adding a doggy door will enable your pet to go outside to use the bathroom, get some exercise, or enjoy the outdoors for a while. Giving your animal options will help curb destructive behavior while you are away. There are doggy door kits available that are relatively easy to install yourself. If you’d rather not have a doggy door or your yard isn’t fenced, there are other options for potty areas for your animals. A cat box is an easy solution, and puppy pads or small grassy areas are available to put in an area of your garage that is sanitary and offers easy clean up.

Kennel

Offering your pet a kennel may seem unnecessary when you are already giving them the garage to stay in. The reality is that many animals find kennels to be comforting. Consider offering your animal a kennel to feel safe and comfortable even if you don’t close them inside it. This will allow your pet to stay warmer in the colder months, feel safe, and have a comfortable place to sleep. Give them some comfortable padding and a blanket over the top to keep it dark.

garage3

Photo by Arland Marlano

High Shelving
Investing in some high shelves will be extremely useful once you’ve converted your garage into a pet sanctuary. In order to maintain areas in your garage for home improvement or vehicle maintenance, high shelving is an area to keep vehicle fluids, paints, and other chemicals that are harmful. For tools, add a hanging board that is high enough to keep your pet away; also, be sure it is securely fastened to the wall.
Before allowing your pet to take over the garage, take the important steps to making sure your garage is a pet friendly place for them. Remove safety hazards, make it a comfortable place, and agree to kick the car out of its spot to make room for your four-legged friends.

garage4Author Bio: Chelsy is a writer from Montana who is now living in Boise, Idaho. She graduated with her journalism degree from the University of Montana in 2012. She is happiest cuddling with her angsty cat, throwing a Frisbee with her goofy dog, and reading with a glass of wine. Follow her on Twitter!

Prevent Your Dog From Being Stolen

According to the AKC, dog thefts are at an all-time high today. Dogs are stolen for all kinds of reasons: because they’re cute; to resell them, especially if they’re puppies or Toy dogs; for dog fighting; and the list goes on. There’s a surprising trade in dogs stolen out of people’s yards and sent to rescues today, then sold to the public as rescue dogs. These dogs might end up hundreds or thousands of miles from home because of rescue transports. It can be very hard to find your dog if he’s stolen.

Fortunately, there are some precautions you can take to help prevent your dog from being stolen.

At Home

Don’t let your dog off leash or leave him unattended. Keep an eye on your dog at all times. Know where he is and what he’s doing. Of course, it’s not possible to watch your dog every minute. None of us can do that. But don’t let your dog off leash unless you can watch him. Otherwise he might wander away or take off running out of sight. Even when your dog is at home in your yard, check on him frequently. Put a lock on your gate. Make sure that your fences are secure so your dog is less likely to escape. Do keep your dog contained at home and don’t let him wander or roam.

Use Identification. If your dog does get out, make sure he’s wearing a collar with his identification and rabies tags. While a collar can be removed if your dog is stolen, a microchip is permanent. Use a microchip ID for your dog. If your dog is found by an animal shelter or taken to the vet, they have scanners that can pick up the microchip and you can be notified that your dog has been found. You can also use a tattoo for permanent identification.

Breeders should be cautious of buyers visiting their homes. People posing as potential buyers in various cities have stolen dogs and puppies. Be cautious when allowing someone to come to your home. In other cases, homes have been robbed when the breeder was away.

 

When Traveling

Never leave your dog unattended in the car. Dogs have been stolen out of vehicles even if the vehicle is locked.

Don’t tie your dog outside a store or other building. This is a common practice in some big cities like New York but many dogs are stolen this way.

Be watchful. Even when you are in dog-friendly places, keep an eye out for the people and things around you. And watch your dog.

Recovering Your Dog

Make sure you keep your Microchip ID information current. Contact your ID carrier to let them know your dog is missing.

Contact animal control and the police. Contact other pet shelters and rescues in your area.

Have a current photo of your dog. Make fliers and have them ready to go so you can paper the area.

Talk to postal carriers, Fedex, UPS people, school bus drivers, and anyone who knows the neighborhood. They see more than anyone else. Go door to door and talk to neighbors. Talk to convenience store clerks. Talk to everyone.

Check with shelters and rescues everyday. Visit in person. Calling is ineffective.

If you follow these precautions and take these steps, you can prevent your dog from being stolen.

We usually think of our dogs’ paws as tough and able to take everything in stride, if you’ll pardon the pun. And most of the time that’s true. Under normal conditions, such as running and playing in the grass or on dirt, your dog’s paws can do their job. They can support his body and help him go from one place to another without any difficulty. But dogs live all over the earth with their human partners which means they can encounter some adverse conditions. Sometimes it’s necessary to protect your dog’s paws from bad weather, chemicals, and harsh environments.

Weather

One of the most most frequent problems related to a dog’s paws are bad weather conditions. Both extreme heat and icy cold can cause problems for your dog’s paws. In both cases the problem is often made worse by walking on pavement and other city surfaces. Hot pavement can hurt your dog’s paw pads, especially if he has to walk on excessively hot pavement for long periods of time. Your dog’s paws are not as sensitive as your feet, but you should definitely try to avoid hot pavement with your dog if possible.

In the winter, pavement can become icy and it’s hard for dogs to walk on the ice, just as it is for you. In addition, many cities put down de-icing chemicals on pavements and roads which are harmful to dogs if ingested. This means that if your dog licks his paws when he gets home, the chemicals can hurt him. So, if you take your dog for a walk on icy pavements or roads in the winter, be sure to rinse or wash his paws off with warm water when you get home so he won’t lick off these dangerous chemicals.

In both cases – hot and cold pavements – a dog’s paws can become chafed and cracked from walking on these less than ideal surfaces. Fortunately, there are some good products you can use to put on your dog’s paws which will help prevent this kind of chafing and cracking. Look for products for paws that say they toughen or protect a dog’s paws. They usually contain wax or petroleum jelly type ingredients.

Snow

Snow can pose a special problem for longhaired dogs and their paws. It will make little frozen balls between your dog’s toes and paw pads when he walks or plays in it. You can prevent this with some breeds by keeping the hair between the toes and pads trimmed. Or, you can be sure to rinse the paws with warm water when your dog comes in from being out in the snow to make sure the little snow balls melt away.

Paw care

You can also keep your dog’s paws in good shape by trimming the nails regularly. Nails that are allowed to grow too long can ultimately cause your dog problems. There are nail trimmers, clippers, and scissor-style cutters so you can trim your dog’s nails yourself at home. If you start when your dog is young and take off just a small portion each week, most dogs will tolerate the procedure well. If you or your dog hate doing nails, you can have your vet or a pet groomer trim the nails for you.

Booties

Besides bad weather and city living, some dogs live in places where walking can be difficult. Rocky landscapes, lots of snow, and other issues may present problems for a dog’s paws. Old age can also make it hard for a dog to get a good grip with his paws. In these cases, dog booties are often a good idea. You can buy sets of four booties or sets of two and use them only on the back paws. Booties with gore-tex soles are often recommended for better gripping. Booties for dogs can work the same way they do for humans – they protect the dog’s paws and give him added gripping ability. They’re especially good if the dog has to do any climbing and they can help with elderly dogs who sometimes have problems getting their balance on slippery floors.

Even dogs who live in the city can benefit from wearing booties to protect them from hot pavement, ice, and rain.

Keep in mind that some dogs have very tough pads and they probably don’t need to wear booties and only need to have sensible precautions taken to keep their paws safe. Every dog is different. But if you have a dog who does have more sensitive paws, there are some good ways to protect his paws no matter where you live or what the two of you face.