Archive for Dog Products

It has always been a great quest for me to take my dog along with me when I travel. But along with this dream there has always been a fear lingering around – how well would I be able to travel taking care of my lovable companion. Last month few of my friends have camper down from Wisconsin and joined us for some warm, sunny weather in Arizona. It has been the first time that I am spending so much time with my buddies after I had completed and moved out of my college and that too taking my pooch along.

It was really interesting for all of us and the most beautiful part was that for the first time we have been able to disclose our hearts and let our strengths and fears flow out making that camp fire blaze more deeply.

My only concern whenever I travel out is about Hector – my lovable bulldog. I was always scared to drive him with me out to the unknown situations that we may face during our journey.

 

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Travel Safely with Your Pet

Though I was smart, capable and strong, what has troubled me was taking care of Hector. I usually thought that at home I am a very good pet parent. But, when it comes to travelling with him, I may be the worst and would fail in taking best care of hector as he is really a lifeline for me. Many times because of this fear, I missed many of the interesting journeys and would later undergo a hurtful repentance about not capable of taking hector out on an adventure.

However, my friends have pushed me along the edge and helped me overcome my inner weakness. They have planned out everything for me and more interestingly knowing my weak point about Hector, they have amazingly worked out everything for the safety of my furry pal. On the other hand, I would rather say that it was definitely a pet-friendly campervan travel with lot of things to enjoy with hector. The moments I have cherished with hector and my friends, has made a new person, rather I would say that I have evolved to be a much better pet parent for my furry pal.

 

What Are Some Safety Tips for Traveling With A Dog?

 

So, if you are doddering on the edge out of the fear of travelling with your pooch and bout the health of your lovable companion when on the campervan then these simple tips are of great use.

  • Always have a car harness and a leash with you that may hold your dog when you people are tramping on the legs.
  • Take ample of dog food with you never to run of it until you finish your journey. You can even get some local food that is specially meant for doggies only.
  • There are a lot of people out there who love dogs, so there is no fear to be afraid about the harsh behavior of the people around you towards your pet when travelling with him.
  • Don’t forget to pack dog bed in case you may require when camping at outer regions.
  • If you are going for a long camp holidays, take flea and tick medications along with you. As during warm weathers flea and tick infestation is at peak. Moreover, you may not be aware whether the places you are going to visit are heavily infested with fleas and ticks or not. As the proverb goes – “Prevention is better than Cure.”
  • For instant relief of fleas and ticks, stock capstar along with you. This controls heavy flea and tick infestation.
  • If you are planning to camp near river fronts or have a plan to go swimming in ponds or lakes, take dog floating vest along with you. This ensures your pet’s safety in case you are taking him in unknown waters.

 

Looking back to my journey with Hector along with my friends has really helped me to overcome my fear of travelling along with my lovable companion.
With the journey being a teaching lesson to me, I have really come over my inner weakness and it has deeply instigated inert strength in me. Always having a memoir of this travel, I am moving ahead of planning some of the adventurous campervan travel with Hector in the near future.

When you place your disabled pet in a wheelchair for the first time it can go very smoothly or it can go very bad. Some pets just pick up on it like they’re so used to it but some will resist it like it’s a living hell. If this happens, don’t panic. As I have discovered from checking wheelchair blogs it is usually because your pet is not yet accustomed to the wheelchair. When faced with something they are not used to some pets freeze, retreat, or get really angry.

So all you need to do is to get your pet accustomed to the wheelchair. It sounds simple enough and it could be that simple or it could take a long time and a lot of patience. This will depend on your pet and your patience.

To get your pet accustomed to the wheelchair put it somewhere they often can see. May be near where they eat or sleep. If you think it is no longer an eyesore to them, show them how it works by moving it around and let them touch it. Once they get used to that, place your pet inside the wheelchair but keep it in place. Do not walk them yet. Just let your pet take it in that he’s in the wheelchair. When he seems comfortable, remove your pet from the wheelchair. Each step can take from a day to several days before your pet will get comfortable so, like I said, be patient. It’s up to you to see if he’s ok or not with each step. But if you are patient and persistent, soon your pet will move little by little on his own when you put him in the wheelchair.

Bio:

Marie Malacaman is the web administrator for Best Friend Mobility. She is a professional dog walker and pet sitter.

It is high time for another camping trip and your pup is equally happy to come along with you wherever you decide to go. When it comes to packing it is crucial to bring all the necessities for you and for your pet, which might be daunting and if you are inexperienced you might have a tough time deciding what to bring. Fear no more, here you can see some basics that should cover all your pet’s needs, so let’s line up the most useful things to pack in a doggy backpack:

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  • The main concern is your dog’s wellbeing so if the dog suffers from a particular health concern preparing its medicine ‘pack’ is a must, plus what every animal will benefit from is a product like sentinel, that will address heartworms caused by mosquito bites, heart or lungs failure could be the fatal outcome, so better be safe than sorry. Also prepare them with flea and tick repellants, so they can roam around freely.
  • Dog Bowls for food and water are essential and a good range is available on the market; it will satisfy almost everyone (squishable and easy to clean products win the most as while on holiday nobody wants to spend much time cleaning and washing up).

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  • Portable dog bed and blanket – slightly elevated products of this type are preferable as insects will be limited in reaching your pet and therefore keeping it safe, if the same bed is comfy your pet will love you even
  • Leash and Collar go ‘hand in hand’ and most dogs will treat them like we treat clothing – should not walk out of the house without them! Retractable leashes are good for smaller and well behaved dogs, though a good ‘training’ session to make a dog more ‘sociable’ and used to other dogs and people is also
  • Poop Bags – an imperative, even if the walk is to last a very short time the dog should not be walked without them.
  • Brush – though some dogs are not very fond of being brushed it is quite important to be clean and tidy, and this item in your dog’s backpack will come in really ‘handy’.
  • Toys and Treats – there will never be enough of these and be generous with t&t, as in occupying the dog with lots of toys, exercising them, having them run and walk a lot, play and engage with you. That is the true meaning of a doggy holiday.

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  • Towel – some might ask what for? Well when the dog gets wet and that is definitely going to happen whipping it with the towel you packed will be really practical;
  • 20-foot Long Lead/Tether – to chain the dog if necessary, while in the campsite or in the forest for example.

Since this type of a holiday will mostly be within the campsites that are ‘dog friendly’, obeying the rules of the premises will be prudent. The reason is that you might like to re-visit the same place again. Leaving a good impression will be the ‘carte blanche’ for the future and the dog will like that in equal terms.

By Chelsy Ranard

I wish I could give my fur-children the world. I dream of a room filled with cat trees, scratching posts, hidey boxes, and catnip for Kitten. I dream about a yard with a pool, giant sticks, treats hidden in every corner, meaty bones buried, and comfy beds for Titan. The reality is that I adopted my cat, Kitten (original name, I know), when I was a broke college student six years ago. We adopted Titan a few months ago and we are considerably better off now than I was back then, but we are still new homeowners without a ton of extra money. Ever since Kitten was a kitten I’ve been utilizing these thrifty tips to provide for her without breaking the bank. Now that I have a giant oaf of a German Shepherd running around, I’ve learned a few more tips as well.
1. Rescuing
Rescuing your pet instead of purchasing from a breeder is the first step to being a frugal pet owner. The fees that come with rescuing an animal usually go towards spay/neutering, microchipping, and initial vet visits for your pet if you’re rescuing from a shelter. Also, if you are adopting an animal that is older or black in color you will usually get a cheaper adoption rate on them because they have so many issues being adopted. Before you decide to bring a new, furry addition into your home, consider your local shelter before anything else.
2. Couponing
The holy grail of thriftiness! Couponing is an easy way to stay frugal in any area of life, really. But there are so many options for coupons these days. I’ve found coupon deals for Petco, PetSmart, BarkBox, and a dozen more stores that offer pet necessities. For the sake of being thrifty, I wouldn’t recommend using big name outlets frequently for your animal’s needs, but if you need to, be sure to find a coupon for the outlet of your choice.
3. DIY
There are so many alternatives that DIY offers that will save you a ton of money. My favorite DIY project for my pets are no-sew pet beds. It’s such a cheap and simple alternative to buying an expensive bed for your animal. Especially for Titan, a bed for a dog his size is not a cheap purchase. You can also create DIY cat and dog toys pretty easily using old T-shirts, empty water bottles, string, and other craft supplies lying around.
4. Thrifting
Shopping at thrift stores has the potential to save you a lot of money, but perhaps not a lot of time. The biggest issue I’ve run into with thrift store shopping is that you are required to do a lot of searching. However, buying old blankets at a thrift store to use as a dog bed is a great alternative to buying one from a store or making one. I’ve purchased tennis balls, blankets, craft supplies, cat boxes, and food/water dishes at craft stores for my animals at a fraction of the cost. Just be prepared to shop around if you can’t find what you need at the first thrift store you go to.

5. Baking

This has become my new favorite way to be frugal with my pets. There are many easy-to-follow recipes for baking your own dog and cat treats on Pinterest. Cat treat recipes are a little more difficult to find, but not impossible. The treats you can bake your pets are not only a cheaper alternative, but a healthier one as well. And for pups with a sensitive stomach like Titan, it’s been perfect. The recipes I use require six ingredients or less and it’s mostly ingredients I have in the house already. Titan’s favorite treat is a pumpkin treat that requires canned pumpkin, cinnamon, egg, and flour. Be sure to do your research and avoid ingredients that can harm your pet!

furgalpetbioAuthor Bio: Chelsy is a writer living in Boise, Idaho. She graduated with her BA in journalism in 2012. When she isn’t spending time with her animals or being thrifty, she enjoys camping, trying new beer, and exploring Boise with her boyfriend, David. Follow her on Twitter!

Photos By Chelsy Ranard

Whether your dog’s ears are long, shaped like a rosebud or bat ears, or they stand up in prick-eared fashion, it’s important to keep them clean. In extreme cases, dogs with dirty, infected ears can lose their hearing. Infected ears can lead to other health problems as well. Fortunately, regular ear cleaning is easy to do and it doesn’t require much in the way of accessories.

What you will need

You only need a few things to clean your dog’s ears:

 

  • Ear cleaner
  • Cotton balls or cloth

If you have a Terrier breed or a dog that has a lot of hair inside the ear, you may need a hemostat. This is a pair of tweezers with a small clamp-shaped end and handles so you can easily remove hair from inside the ears. This will allow air to get inside the ear and prevent ear infections. You can use a little ear powder sprinkled in the ear to make this hair easier to grip.

With most dogs you can simply use the ear cleaner and the cotton balls or cloth. You can buy ear cleaner from your veterinarian or from a good pet store or a pet retailer online. There are many good brands.

Cleaning your dog’s ears

To clean your dog’s ears you should make sure the ear cleaning solution is at room temperature. Nothing will make a dog squeamish about his ears faster than if you squirt cold liquid into them so make sure the cleaner is a pleasant temperature.

Try to clean your dog’s ears when you’re both relaxed. Your dog should be in front of you. It’s good if you have some treats with you so you can reward him for his cooperation.

Start by putting a few drops of the cleaner in one of your dog’s ears. Then gently massage the base of your dog’s ear. Slowly move your fingers over the base of the ear to loosen any wax and dirt that have accumulated. This should feel good to your dog. Then gently take one of the cotton balls or the cloth and stroke the inside of the ear to remove the loosened wax and dirt. Keep wiping the inside of the ear until the cotton ball or cloth comes away clean. You may have to put in a few more drops in your dog’s ear and massage a little more if the ear is very dirty.

You should not hold the bottle up and pour it into your dog’s ear. Not only is this unpleasant for your dog but that’s far too much liquid to put in your dog’s ear. It only takes a few drops of the cleaner each time to loosen the wax and dirt.

Once you have cleaned the first ear you can move over and clean the other ear. Make sure you give your dog some treats while you’re working to keep him cooperating.

Mites and infections

If your dog has ears that are no more than normally dirty, it should just take you a few minutes to clean them. However, if your dog’s ears are very gunky with brown or black wax, cleaning may take longer. This might indicate that your dog has had some mites or an infection at some time. Look for signs that your dog has any current infection or parasites. If you see anything that looks suspicious you should contact your veterinarian. Your vet can provide you with a miticide to get rid of ear mites. A yeast infection can be harder to eliminate. If you see signs of an infection you should talk to your vet and let him or her examine your dog’s ears.

In most cases you can clean your dog’s ears and be finished in just a few minutes. If you practice cleaning your dog’s ears each week then you will quickly spot any potential problems before they become something to be concerned about.

If you clean your dog’s ears gently and give him some treats while you clean, most dogs won’t mind having their ears cleaned. It also helps if you start cleaning ears when your dog is young so they know that it’s no big deal. Take care of your dog’s ears and you’ll never have a problem.

We usually think of our dogs’ paws as tough and able to take everything in stride, if you’ll pardon the pun. And most of the time that’s true. Under normal conditions, such as running and playing in the grass or on dirt, your dog’s paws can do their job. They can support his body and help him go from one place to another without any difficulty. But dogs live all over the earth with their human partners which means they can encounter some adverse conditions. Sometimes it’s necessary to protect your dog’s paws from bad weather, chemicals, and harsh environments.

Weather

One of the most most frequent problems related to a dog’s paws are bad weather conditions. Both extreme heat and icy cold can cause problems for your dog’s paws. In both cases the problem is often made worse by walking on pavement and other city surfaces. Hot pavement can hurt your dog’s paw pads, especially if he has to walk on excessively hot pavement for long periods of time. Your dog’s paws are not as sensitive as your feet, but you should definitely try to avoid hot pavement with your dog if possible.

In the winter, pavement can become icy and it’s hard for dogs to walk on the ice, just as it is for you. In addition, many cities put down de-icing chemicals on pavements and roads which are harmful to dogs if ingested. This means that if your dog licks his paws when he gets home, the chemicals can hurt him. So, if you take your dog for a walk on icy pavements or roads in the winter, be sure to rinse or wash his paws off with warm water when you get home so he won’t lick off these dangerous chemicals.

In both cases – hot and cold pavements – a dog’s paws can become chafed and cracked from walking on these less than ideal surfaces. Fortunately, there are some good products you can use to put on your dog’s paws which will help prevent this kind of chafing and cracking. Look for products for paws that say they toughen or protect a dog’s paws. They usually contain wax or petroleum jelly type ingredients.

Snow

Snow can pose a special problem for longhaired dogs and their paws. It will make little frozen balls between your dog’s toes and paw pads when he walks or plays in it. You can prevent this with some breeds by keeping the hair between the toes and pads trimmed. Or, you can be sure to rinse the paws with warm water when your dog comes in from being out in the snow to make sure the little snow balls melt away.

Paw care

You can also keep your dog’s paws in good shape by trimming the nails regularly. Nails that are allowed to grow too long can ultimately cause your dog problems. There are nail trimmers, clippers, and scissor-style cutters so you can trim your dog’s nails yourself at home. If you start when your dog is young and take off just a small portion each week, most dogs will tolerate the procedure well. If you or your dog hate doing nails, you can have your vet or a pet groomer trim the nails for you.

Booties

Besides bad weather and city living, some dogs live in places where walking can be difficult. Rocky landscapes, lots of snow, and other issues may present problems for a dog’s paws. Old age can also make it hard for a dog to get a good grip with his paws. In these cases, dog booties are often a good idea. You can buy sets of four booties or sets of two and use them only on the back paws. Booties with gore-tex soles are often recommended for better gripping. Booties for dogs can work the same way they do for humans – they protect the dog’s paws and give him added gripping ability. They’re especially good if the dog has to do any climbing and they can help with elderly dogs who sometimes have problems getting their balance on slippery floors.

Even dogs who live in the city can benefit from wearing booties to protect them from hot pavement, ice, and rain.

Keep in mind that some dogs have very tough pads and they probably don’t need to wear booties and only need to have sensible precautions taken to keep their paws safe. Every dog is different. But if you have a dog who does have more sensitive paws, there are some good ways to protect his paws no matter where you live or what the two of you face.

Many dogs suffer stress when they’re confronted with loud noises from fireworks or thunderstorms. Other dogs feel stress when they travel or when there are unusual things going on in the home such as workers visiting or a new pet in the family. Even a trip to the vet can cause a dog to become anxious and worried. There are all kinds of situations that can make dogs nervous. In these situations a calming collar can sometimes help calm and relax a dog. Even dogs in shelters and rescues have benefited from wearing calming collars.

How do calming collars work?
Currently there are two kinds of calming collars, though they work in similar ways.

Herbal collars
The first kind of calming collar uses fragrant herbs to calm and soothe your dog. The herbs are carefully chosen for their soothing qualities. These collars usually have cloth overlaying the collar underneath so the herbs can be sewn inside. This kind of calming collar is based on aromatherapy. The herbs are typically dried herbs so they do not contain essential oils that might irritate your dog’s skin. Collars that contain dried herbs usually continue to work for about 3-4 months.

DAP collars
The other kind of calming collar available now is a DAP (dog appeasing pheromone) collar. These collars work the same way that other DAP products work. Dog appeasing pheromones are pheromones that mimic the scent that mother dogs release when puppies are nursing. These pheromones are very soothing and calming to dogs. While many DAP products release these pheromones intermittently, when your dog wears a DAP calming collar, the pheromones are released in a sustained fashion. These collars typically last for about 30 days. They are usually plastic collars that can easily be adjusted to fit your dog. The pheromones are in the plastic of the collar and your dog’s body heat helps release them.

Both kinds of calming collars have proven to be effective with dogs who have stress and anxiety issues. Your dog simply wears the calming collar like an ordinary collar, especially when he might be facing a situation that would make him nervous. You should remove the collar before giving your dog a bath. Manufacturers usually suggest that you should not use these collars if your dog has skin lesions or irritated skin. The collars are non-toxic and your dog won’t be harmed if he chews on them though, of course, you should discourage any collar chewing.

Other therapies
If you have a dog who is afraid of thunder, fireworks, or who has other problems with stress and anxiety, calming collars are a good way to help reduce your dog’s initial stress. However, they are not a permanent solution. They don’t solve your dog’s problem. But they are a great way to help your dog stay calmer and feel better. This often makes it easier to work on a long-term solution to your dog’s issues. Calming collars are even good for working with dogs who have problems with separation anxiety. Once a dog begins to calm down and feel less fearful, it is much easier to work on some behavior modification solutions

DIY Doggie Pjs

One of the cutest trends  is doggie pjs. While they can get a little pricey if you’re looking at designer ones, others are pretty reasonable. Of course, if you can’t find ones that you totally love on your dog, then what do you do? You can make your own doggie pjs and still be on trend this year for cheap. Here is what you’ll need to do:

Find some cute baby onesies with legs at your local discount store, online, or even at garage sales. You can always find ones that match your pjs, or that compliment them. Finding a few that are really cheap at a discount store or garage sale can be great to practice on until you get everything down just the way you want. Not sure what size to get? It’s pretty easy, for dogs under 6 pounds, look for preemie clothes. For dogs from 6 to 15 pounds, look for newborn clothes. For dogs over 15 pounds, look for 0-3 month old baby clothes. If you have a larger dog, you will have to look for child sizes. Buying cheap child pjs at garage sales gives you an easy way to determine what size will fit your dog without spending a lot of time, energy, and money buying the wrong one and having to take them all back.

Once you have a few to practice on, start by putting them on your dog, but be careful with their tail for right now as you’ll make an area just for this later. You want the cute design to be up on the back, even if the zipper or buttons are there. Now, take a pen and mark along the behind (for the tail) as well as the stomach. You basically want to leave an area open for your dog to use the bathroom without getting it all over their pjs as well as a opening for their tail to move and wag. Once you have these areas marked, take the pjs off your pooch and cut along the line.

After you’ve got everything cut out, take a needle and thread or your sewing machine, and sew simple hems along every area that you’ve cut. This can be a bit time consuming until you get the hang of it, and you can also find hem tape as well as seam glue at local craft and sewing stores, or online. Once you get a little better with hemming up your dog’s pjs, you can get more fancy with different types of ribbon around the hem and other cute bric-a-brac as well.

Now that everything is sewn up, you are ready for your furry baby to sport their new pjs. It might take a bit for them to get used to the new clothes, but once they do and realize that they are snuggly and comfy, you’ll have a pj fan for life

We all know that our dogs have to have food and water and love, but there is more to caring for a dog than just those three things. There are many other areas, such as exercise, bathing, brushing, and so on that help ensure a dog is happy and healthy. If you are new to owning a dog or you simply want to make sure that you’ve got everything covered, here are five dog accessories that you simply cannot live without:

  1. Collar – This might seem like a given but you need to make sure that you have the right collar for your dog. Smaller dogs won’t need a big, sturdy collar, a thinner one will do just fine, but larger breeds will need a sturdy collar that won’t break when you’re out for a walk on a leash. You also want to make sure that you have the right fit on your dog’s collar, if it’s too small, you can choke your dog, and too big means they can slip out of it, losing any ID tags they have.
  2. Brush – You may think that you don’t have to brush your particular dog breed, but every dog needs to be brushed. There are several reasons for this, the main one being that it helps to curb shedding any time of the year. Every dog breed sheds, some just more than others, by brushing your dog, you can stop most of the shed hair from sticking to your furniture, clothing, car, and carpets. Plus brushing is a great way to inspect your dog for any bites, bumps, or other problems that you may not notice by simply patting them on the back. Talk with your groomer about what brush is right for your particular dog breed.
  3. Leash – Sure this one goes hand in hand with the dog’s collar, but do you have the right size leash for your dog? You want to make sure that you give your dog enough room to run without being so far away that you cannot control them. Also, you need a strong leash with a good clasp that isn’t going to break if your dog tugs on it. The last thing you want is for your dog to go chasing after a squirrel on a walk and get away from you and get hurt. Make sure that your dog’s leash is good quality that won’t break, yet still gives them enough room to run and exercise.
  4. Bedding – Some of us are guilty of letting our dogs sleep on our beds with us, but they still need their own bed, their own space. You can find all different sizes of pet beds that will fit your dog perfectly. These are pretty inexpensive, usually less than $20 (except for the very large ones) unless you want something very specific or designer, which will cost more. Pet beds offer your pet their own space in your house. You should set up their bed along with some of their toys in a corner or spot where they know that is their own space. It will give them a place to feel safe in when they are scared or lonely.
  5. Treats – We all love to reward our dogs with treats, but are you giving the right ones? Some treats can be bad for your dog, packing on extra weight they may not need or just being overall junk food for your pet. There are plenty of great treats out there that help with cleaning their teeth, bad doggie breath, and so much more. And if you are wary of all the different ingredients in your dog’s treats, you can easily make some of your own for your furry kiddo.

 

Of course, you may decide that you need other dog accessories for your pampered pooch, but these are the main five – aside from food, water, and love – to keep your dog happy and healthy for a long time to come.

Thanksgiving is nearly here once again and for most of us that means wonderful aromas wafting through the house and a table groaning under the weight of turkey and other favorite dishes. There will be family and friends gathered ’round and perhaps a slice of pumpkin pie. But, what about your dog? What does Thanksgiving mean for him?

 

Well, if you’re lucky, it won’t mean a trip to the vet because you’ve overfed him or given him some sharp bones to eat! Most of us want to share Thanksgiving with our dogs but, the truth is, Thanksgiving can be a dangerous time for pets. Rich foods can cause gastrointestinal upsets or even pancreatitis. Giving your dog a cooked turkey bone can lead to a punctured esophagus or other puncture in your dog’s stomach or G.I. Tract, so no cooked bones! Here are some other tips for you and your dog this Thanksgiving.

 

  • According to one poll, 56 percent of pet owners said they gave their pets Thanksgiving leftovers but you need to be careful about what you share with your dog. For instance, turkey is great. It’s an excellent protein that is nice and lean – as long as you remove the skin. And be sure to avoid giving your dog any cooked bones. Cooked bones are brittle so they can easily snap and form jagged edges that are harmful to dogs.

 

  • Say no to onion and garlic. Many Thanksgiving dishes contain onion, garlic, leeks, and scallions. If your dog eats these ingredients in any large amount, it can be harmful to him. These items are all members of the allium family and they have been linked to a form of anemia in dogs. Sure, you may occasionally give your dog something that contains garlic and it doesn’t hurt him, but don’t give your dog any foods that contain much of these ingredients.

 

  • Yes to veggies. It’s fine to give your dog some leftovers of green beans, cranberries, or even macaroni and cheese (if he can eat cheese). Mashed potatoes are good, too. Dogs enjoy many vegetable dishes. However, watch out for the “extras” and fancy fixin’s – those things added to a dish to make it special. For instance, if you add garlic or sour cream to your mashed potatoes, it could make it off limits for your dog. If you use cranberry sauce that has a lot of sugar added, it won’t be so good for your dog. If you would like to give your dog some veggies, try setting aside a bowl for your dog before you add the extras to it.

 

  • Avoid fat. Just avoid giving your dog extra fat, in general. While we like to see good named fat sources in dog food, it’s not a good idea to feed your dog leftovers that contain generous amounts of fat at Thanksgiving. Most dogs aren’t used to eating so much fat all at one time. The result can be an attack of acute pancreatitis. Vets report that the days following Thanksgiving are some of their busiest of the year for pancreatitis in dogs.

 

  • Be careful with other foods. There are some foods you should never give to dogs such as chocolate, macadamia nuts, grapes, raisins, pits from cherries and other pitted foods, and the artificial sweetener xylitol.

 

  • As for the pumpkin pie? Well, canned pumpkin, minus the spiced pie filling would be better for your dog. And dogs really don’t need whipped cream.

 

  • And one more time: No Cooked Bones! It’s fine if you would like to give your dog a raw bone such as a turkey neck. Raw bones are comparatively soft and easy for your dog to chew and digest. They won’t break off into jagged pieces when he chews them.

 

You can see there are many delicious things you can share with your dog at Thanksgiving. Just give some thought and care to what you give your dog and you won’t end up taking him to see the vet.